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Chapter 1

CAS CL 102 Chapter Notes - Chapter 1: Wild Beasts, Aeneid, Exemplum


Department
Classical Studies
Course Code
CAS CL 102
Professor
James Uden
Chapter
1

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Common Grammar Mistakes
1. Quotations
a. In-paragraph Quotations: In this case, the best practice is something called “text
weaving,” where you connect a quotation to a sentence in your own words or attribute
it to the author. This way, you never let someone else’s words stand as their own
sentence in your paper.
Avoid: “I sing of arms and a man” (Book 1, line 1).
Use: Vergil’s Aeneid opens with the famous phrase, ““I sing of arms and a man”
(Book 1, line 1).
b. Block Quotations: For especially large chunks of text (according to Purdue, anything
more than four lines of prose or three lines of verse, https://owl.english.purdue.edu/
owl/resource/747/03/), indent your quotation.
c. Textual Omission: If you leave out a word or words, indicate this by using ellipses (…).
Original: “I sing of arms and a man: his fate had made him fugitive; he was the
first to journey from the coasts of Troy as far as Italy and the Lavinian shores”
(Book 1, lines 1-4).
Adapted: “I sing of arms and a man; he was the first to journey from the
coasts of Troy as far as Italy and the Lavinian shores” (Book 1, lines 1-4).
d. Textual Variant: If you change a word when quoting, be sure to indicate you’ve done so
by putting the altered word into brackets [ ].
Original: “Tell me the reason, Muse: what was the wound to her divinity, so
hurting her that she, the queen of gods, compelled a man remarkable for
goodness to endure so many crises, so many trials?” (Book 1, lines 13-17).
Adapted: “Tell me the reason, Muse: what was the wound to her divinity, so
hurting her that [Juno], the queen of gods, compelled a man remarkable for
goodness to endure so many crises, so many trials?” (Book 1, lines 13-17).
2. Footnotes?
3. e.g. vs. i.e.
a. e.g., short for exempli gratia (“for the sake of an example”), is often used when you wish
to list specific examples
Example: “Romulus and Remus were put in great danger when they were
exposed (e.g.: starvation, wild beasts, and harsh elements).”
find more resources at oneclass.com
find more resources at oneclass.com
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