Textbook Notes (368,460)
United States (206,052)
Sociology (4)
SOC 253 (3)
Brandt (3)
Chapter 3

Ch3-Criminal law: Liberty vs. Control

12 Pages
66 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Sociology
Course
SOC 253
Professor
Brandt
Semester
Spring

Description
Chapter 3 Criminal Law: Control vs. Liberty 03/02/2014 George Zimmerman Case Very specific qualities for juries. Rule of Law Standards of behavior and privilege are established by laws and not by monarchs or  religious leaders.  We are all subject to criminal law.  Why do governments make laws? 1.To forbid and prevent conduct that unjustifiably inflicts or threatens harm to individuals or public interests; 2.To subject to public control persons whose conduct indicates that they are disposed to commit crimes; 3.To safeguard conduct that is without fault from condemnation as criminal; 4.To give fair warning of the nature of the conduct declared to constitute an offense; 5.To differentiate on reasonable grounds between serious and minor offenses. Types of Law Criminal Civil Administrative Case Procedural What do Laws do? Common sense mostly.  Support the powerful­ People who get to make the law are the powerful. You almost have to know people to  get stuff done.  Mala In Se Acts which are prohibited because they are considered harmful in themselves. Murder, rape, theft Mala Prohibita Acts which are prohibited because of the law, and not necessarily because they are harmful or inherently  evil. Drug use, Prostitution, immoral but not necessarily harmful. How are laws made? In PPT.  st July 1  of every year. Criminal Law State We can write our own laws, cannot be less restrictive then federal law, can be more restrictive. Should states have the right to legalize the possession of small amounts of marijuana, in lieu of the Federal  Controlled Substance Act? A federal agent can legally arrest people for marijuana in Colorado even though it’s legal.  Local Criminal Law Home­rule vs. Statutory. (Home rule­ write out own.) Misdemeanor in nature. Limited jurisdiction. Enacted by majority vote of council. Cannot deny rights guaranteed by state constitutions or U.S. Constitution  Principle of Legality Citizens cannot be punished for conduct for which no law against it exists. The law must prevent against harm. Ex Post Facto Laws Provides that citizens cannot be punished for actions committed before laws against the actions were  passed and the government cannot increase the penalty of a specific crime after the crime was committed. Cannot be arrested or tried for a crime committed prior to law being affective.  Due Process Substantive ­ Limits the government’s power to criminalize behavior unless there is a compelling reason for  the public interest to do so;  Procedural – requires that the government follow standard procedures and treat all defendants equally. Stare Decisis The US system of developing and applying case law on the basis of precedent established in previous  cases.  Police can no longer “hobble” prisoners, (tying hands and legs) because of ruling in Wyoming case, where  obese man died from it.  Void for Vagueness Laws that do not use clear and specific language to define prohibited behaviors cannot be upheld. A New Jersey (1939) law provided as follows: "Any person not engaged in any lawful  occupation, known to be a member of any gang consisting of two or more persons, who  has been convicted at least three times of being a disorderly person, or who has been  convicted of any crime, in this or in any other State, is declared to be a gangster." Laws have to be clear and specific.  Right to Privacy Laws that violate personal privacy cannot be upheld Void for Overbreadth Laws that go too far in that they criminalize legally protected behavior in an attempt to make some other  behavior illegal cannot be upheld.  General Crime Categories Felony Misdemeanor Offense Jaywalking Treason Inchoate Offense Incomplete crime Tried to do the crime, but didn’t complete the crime. Model Penal Code Big book that classifies all crimes Guidelines for U.S. criminal codes published in 1962 by the American Law Institute that classify and define  crimes into categories. Crimes are classified according to the victim of the crime. Classified by crimes against state, persons, habitation, property. Crimes against Person Homicide Killing of a person by another person Classes: st 1  degree 2  degree Involuntary Manslaughter Vehicular Etc Rape Nonconsensual sexual act Robbery The unlawful taking or attempted taking of property that is in the immediate possession of another by force  or threat of force or violence and/or by putting the victim in fear.  Assault and Battery Hitting someone who doesn’t want to be hit.  The unlawful, intentional inflicting, or attempted or threatened inflicting, of serious injury upon the person of  another. While aggravated assault and simple assault are standard terms for reporting purposes, most state  penal codes use labels like first­degree and second­degree to make such distinctions.  Kidnapping The taking away by force of a person against his or her will and holding that person in false imprisonment. Taking someone somewhere they don’t want to go. Charged with kidnapping: moved from kitchen to the bedroom in domestic abuse cases Crimes against Habitation Burglary Combines two less­serious offenses – trespassing combined with the intent to commit (another) a crime. Entry, combined with 
More Less

Related notes for SOC 253

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit