COMMUN 2100 Textbook Notes

16 Pages
49 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Communication
Course
COMMUN 2100
Professor
All Professors
Semester
Fall

Description
Comm 2100 Textbook Notes Chapter 1  Feedback: Receiver sends own message to the source, making communication a reciprocal process  Interpersonal communication: Communication between two or a few people  Encoding: A message is transformed into an understandable sign and symbol system  Decoding: Message is interpreted   Noise: Anything that interferes with successful communication   Medium: Means of sending information   Mass Medium: When medium is a technology that carries messages to a large number of people  Mass Communication: Process of creating shared meaning between mass media and audiences   Inferential feedback: Indirect feedback rather than direct (Ex: TV ratings) − Since no direct feedback, executives must infer what will improve ratings  Cultural definition and communication: A symbolic process whereby reality is produced, maintained, repaired and  transformed  Culture: Learned behavior of members of a given social group − Patterned, repetitive ways of thinking  − Forms through which people make sense of their lives − Medium through which all of live’s events must flow − Mean through which people communication, perpetuate and develop their knowledge about and attitudes  toward life − Culture is learned   Culture values can be contested, especially in a pluralistic, democratic society—dominant culture  Culture: World made meaningful; it is socially constructed and maintained through communication. It limits as  well as liberates us; it differentiates as well as unites us. It defines our realities and thereby shapes the ways we  think, feel, and act   Technological determinism: It is machines and their development that drive economic and cultural change  Media Literacy: ability to effectively and efficiently comprehend and use any form of mediated communication  Oral/Preliterate Cultures those without written language  − Meaning in language is specific and local − Knowledge must be passed orally − Memory is crucial − Myth and history are intertwined  Ideogrammatic alphabets: Appeared in Egypt, Sumer and Urban China  Syllable Alphabet: Appearing around 1800 BCE, employs words  Papyrus: rolls of sliced strips of reed pressed together (Egyptians, Greeks, and Romans)  Parchment: Writing material made from prepared animal skins (100 b.c.e.)  Elements of Media Literacy − Critical thinking skill enabling audience members to develop independent judgments about media content  − Understanding of process of mass communication − Awareness of impact of media on individual and society − Strategies for analyzing and discussing media messages  − Understanding of media context as text that provides insight into our culture and our lives − Ability to enjoy, understand, and appreciate media content   Multiple points of access: To approach media content from variety of directions and derive from  it many levels of meaning   We control meaning making for our own enjoyment or appreciation  − Development of effective and responsible production skills − Understanding of ethical and moral obligations of media practitioners  Media literacy skills  − Ability and willingness to make an effort to understand content, to pay attention and to filter out noise   − Understanding of and respect for power of media messages  rd  3 ­person effect: Common attitude that others are influenced by media messages but wea are  not  − Ability to distinguish emotional from reasoned reactions when responding to content and to act  accordingly  − Development of heightened expectations of media content  − Knowledge of genre conventions and ability to recognize when they are being mixed   Genre: Categories of expression within different media  Conventions: Characterizations of a certain genre by certain distinctive standardized style  elements − Ability to think critically about media messages, no matter how credible their sources − Knowledge of internal language of various media and ability to understand effects, no matter how  complex  Production values: Choice of lighting, editing, special effects, music, camera angle, location on  page, size and placement of headline  Chapter 2  Day­and­date release: Simultaneously releasing movie to public in some combo of theater, video­on­demand,  DVD, and download  Platform: means of delivering specific piece of media content  Media multitasking: Consuming many different kinds of media  Convergence: Erosion of traditional distinctions among media  Forces that alter media industry 1) Concentration of Ownership and Conglomeration  − Through mergers, acquisitions, buyouts, and hostile takeovers, very small number of conglomerates  are coming to own more and more of world’s media outlets − Conglomeration: Increase in ownership of media outlets by larger, nonmedia companies  Problems with conglomeration: Influence on what news is reported, dominance of bottom­line  mentality − News corporations are focused on sensationalism and essentially irrelevant issues − Many argue concentration and conglomeration is inevitable and possibly necessary; companies need  to maximize outlets and get to the fragmented audiences − Economies of Scale: Bigger can in fact sometimes be better because relative cost of operation’s  output declines as size of endeavor grows − Oligopoly: Concentration of media industries into even smaller number of companies 2) Globalization  − Primarily large, multinational conglomerates that are doing lion’s share of media acquisitions  − Worried large outlets will influence how news is reported  − Defenders point to need to reach fragmented and widespread audience  3) Audience Fragmentation  − Audience segments are more narrowly defined  − Narrowcasting: Media targeting smaller audiences with like characteristics  − New digital technologies promise more audience fragmentation  − Addressable technologies: Technologies permitting transmission of very specific content to equally  specific audience members  − Taste Publics: Groups of people bound by little more than interest in given form of media content − Social media may bring audiences back to be more robust and more numerous  4) Hypercommercialism  − Having an overabundance of commercials and advertisements  − Companies are trying to make as much money as they can with fragmenting audiences  − Bugs: Commercials that run at the bottom of the screen during a show, according to some insult  viewers and creators of show − Product placement and brand entertainment have become popular ways to insert brands into shows − Payola: Radio stations accepting payment from record promoters to play their songs  Synergy: Using as many channels of delivery as possible  Platform agnostic: Having no preference for where we access our media content  Really simple syndication: Aggregators allowing web users to create their own content assembles from Internet’s  limitless supply of material  Appointment consumption: Audiences consume content at time predetermined by producer and distributor  Consumption­on­demand: Ability to consume any content, anytime, anywhere Chapter 12  Ambient advertising: Ads showing up in non­traditional settings  Murketing: Our susceptibility to marketing arises from our ignorance of its pervasiveness   Blinks: One­second commercials between songs on the radio   Siquis: Pinup want ads for all sorts of products and services  Shopbills: Attractive, artful business cards  Newsbook: Books that contained ads  Unique selling proposition: Highlighting aspect of product that sets it apart from other brands in same product  category  Parity products: Most brands in given product are exactly the same  Specific complaints about advertising  − Advertising is intrusive: It is everywhere and interferes with our experience − Advertising is deceptive: Implicitly and sometimes explicitly promises to improve people’s lives through  consumption or purchase of sponsor’s products  − Advertising exploits children: Critics contend children are simply not intellectually capable of  interpreting intent of these ads before age of 7 or 8 to rationally judge worth of advertising claims − Advertising demeans and corrupts culture  AIDA Approach: to persuade consumers, advertising must attract attention, create interest,  stimulate desire, and promote action  Consumer Culture: Culture in which personal worth and identity reside not in ourselves but in  products with which we surround ourselves  − Critics further contend consumer culture also demeans individuals who live in it  Retainer: Agreed­upon price that production is billed at   Commissions: How placement of advertising is compensated   Departments of Ad Agencies − Administration: Agency’s management and accounting operations  − Account Management: Liaison between agency and client  − Creative department: Where advertising is developed from idea to ad − Media department: Makes decisions about where and when to place ads and then buy appropriate time  and space  Cost per thousand: Cost of reaching 1,000 audience members  −Market research: Tests product viability in market, best venues, nature of buyers, and effectiveness of ad  Cease­and­desist order: Demanding practice be stopped   Corrective Advertising: Order creation and distribution   Puffery: Little lie that makes advertising more entertaining than it otherwise might be   Copy testing: Measuring effectiveness of advertising messages by showing them to consumers   Consumer juries: review number of approaches or variations of a campaign or ad  Forced exposure: Requires advertisers to bring consumers to theatre and people are asked preferences of certain  ads in TV show  Recognition tests: People who have seen given publication are asked if they have seen a specific ad  Recall testing: Consumers are asked to identify print or broadcast ads they most easily remember   Awareness tests: To measure cumulative effect of campaign in terms of consumer consciousness   Banners: Static online billboards placed conspicuously on a web page  Search Marketing: Advertising sold next to or in search results produced by users’ keyword searches  Lead generation: Using internet­created databases to collect names, addresses, email addresses and other  information about likely clients or customers   Rich Media: Sophisticated, interactive Web advertising, usually employing sound and video  Sponsorships: Web pages including a number of ad placements, advertorials, and other co­branded sections   Return on Investment (ROI): Accountability­based measurement of advertising success   Performance­based advertising: website carrying ad gets paid only when consumer takes some specific action  Engagement: Psychological and behavioral measure of ad effectiveness designed to replace CPM  Accountability metrics: How effectiveness of specific ad or campaign will be judged   Value­compensation programs: “All or at least significant part” of payment of agency’s fees “is predicated on  meeting pre­established goals”  Permission marketing: Advertiser and consumer act like partners sharing info for mutual benefit  Prosumers: Proactive consumers who reject most traditional advertising and use multiple sources not only to  research a product but to negotiate price and other benefits    Demographic segmentation: Practice of appealing to audiences defined by varying personal and social  characteristics   Psychographic segmentation: Appealing to consumer groups with similar lifestyles, attitudes, values and  behavior patterns   VALS: psychographic segmentation strategy that classifies consumers in increasingly segmented to values and  lifestyles   Demographic identifiers − Innovators: Successful, sophisticated, high self­esteem − Thinkers: Motivated by ideals  − Achievers: Goal­oriented lifestyles and deep commitment to career and family − Experiencers: Motivated by self­expression − Believers: Motivated by ideals  − Strivers: Trendy, fun loving − Makers: Motivated by self­expression  − Survivors: Narrowly focused lives  Chapter 11  Flacks: Derogatory name given to workers in public relations   Astroturf: Fake grassroots organization   Public Relations definition from Public Relations Society of America − Public relations helps our complex, pluralistic society to reach decisions and function more effectively by  contributing to mutual understanding among groups and institutions.   Pseudo­event: Event staged specifically to attract public attention   Public: Any group of people with stake in organization, issue, or idea − Employees − Stockholders − Communities − Media − Government − Investment community − Customers  Fixed­fee arrangement: firm performs specific set of services for client for specific and prearranged fee  Collateral Materials: Adding surcharge for handling printing, research, and photographs  14 interrelated services of Public Relations 1. Community relations 2. Counseling 3. Development/fundraising − Cause marketing: PR in support of social issues and causes 4. Employee/member relations 5. Financial relations 6. Government affairs − Lobbying: directly interacting to influence elected officials or government regulators and agents 7. Industry Relations 8. Issue management 9. Media relations 10. Marketing communication  11. Minority relations/multicultural affairs  12. Public affairs 13. Special events and public participation 14. Research  Positions of Public Relations Operation − Executive: CEO, sets policy and serves as spokesperson for operation  − Account Executive: Provides advice to client, defines problems and situations, assesses needs and  demands of client’s publics, recommends communication plan or campaign, and gathers PR firm’s  resources in support of client − Creative specialists: Anybody necessary to meet communication needs of client − Media specialists: They find right media for clients’ messages − Research: Assessing needs of client’s various publics and effectiveness   Focus groups: Small groups of targeted public are interviewed provide PR operation and its  client with feedback − Government relations: Lobbying or other direct communication with government officials may be  necessary − Financial services  Greenwashing: Public relations practice of countering public relations efforts aimed at clients by  environmentalists   Video news releases: preproduced reports about client or its products distributed free of charge to TV stations   Satellite­delivered media tour: Spokespeople can be simultaneously interviewed by worldwide audience  connected to on­screen interviewee via telephone  Integrated Marketing Communications: Firms actively combine public relations, marketing, advertising, and  promotion functions into a more or less seamless communication campaign  Viral marketing: Strategy that relies on targeting specific Internet users with given communication and relying on  them to spread word through communication channels with which they are most comfortable  85% of Americans think PR practitioners “sometime take advantage of media to present misleading information  that is favorable to their clients  More recently, father of public relations Edward Bernays advocated for ethics in public relations in his late years  Flogs: Fake blogs that are paid to promote their brands  Transparentists: PR professionals calling for full disclosure of their practices—transparency  We are watching a VNR when… − report is accompanied by visuals not from station’s broadcast area − No local station personnel appear  − No verbal or visual attribution − Report appears in part of newscast typically reserved for soft or feature stories  Chapter 3  Linotype: Enabled printers to set type mechanically rather than manually  Offset lithography: Made possible printing from photographic plates rather than from heavy and relatively fragile  metal casts   Dime novels: Inexpensive, concentrated on frontier and adventure stories, attracted growing numbers of readers  Pulp novels: same as dime novels  Aliteracy: People possess ability to read but are unwilling to do so, amounts to doing censors’ work for them  Categories of books − Book club editions: Books sold and distributed by book clubs − El­hi: Textbooks for elementary and high school students − Higher education: Textbooks produced for colleges and universities − Mail­order books: Delivered by mail and are usually a specialized series − Mass market paperbacks: Published only as paperbacks and are designed to appeal to broad readership − Professional books: Reference and educational volumes designed specifically for professionals − Religious books: Volumes such as bibles, catechisms, and hymnals − Standardized tests: Guides and practice books for various examinations − Subscription reference books: Publications such as encyclopedias, atlases and dictionaries bought directly  from publisher − Trade books: Hard or softcover, fiction or non­fiction, cook books, biographies, art books, coffee­table  books, and how­to­books − University press books: Publish non­fiction and scholarly books for colleges   Remainders: Books returned to publishers by bookstores, which then are sold at a much lower rate  E­publishing: Publishing books initially or exclusively online  E­books: Books downloaded in electronic from Internet to computers  Print on demand: Store works digitally and instantly prints, binds and sends book  E­readers: Digital books with appearance of traditional books but content that is digitally stored and accessed  Platform agnostic publishing: Digital and hard copy books available for any and all reading devices  Digital epistolary novel: Readers not only read story as it unfolds but also interact with its characters and visits its  locations   Cottage industry: Description of book industry before conglomeration; publishing houses were small operations  closely identified with personnel  Subsidiary rights: Sale of books, its contents, and even characters to filmmakers, paperback publishers, book  clubs, foreign publishers, and product producers   Instant books: Books published very soon after a well­publicized event  Although first printing press came to colonies in 1638, books were not central colony life; but books and pamphlets  were at heart of colonists’ revolt against England  Developments in 18  and 19  centuries, such as improvements in printing, flowering of American novel, and  introduction of paperback, helped make books mass medium  Censorship threatens values of books, as well as democracy itself  Convergence is reshaping book industry as well as reading experience itself through advances such as e­ publishing, POD, e­books, e­readers, and several different efforts to digitize most of world’s books   Conglomeration affects publishing industry as it has all media, expressing itself through trends such as demand for  profit and Hypercommercialization  Demand for profit and Hypercommercialization manifest themselves in increased importance placed on subsidiary  rights, instant books, “Hollywodization,” and product placement    Book retailing is undergoing change. Large chains dominate business but continue to be challenged by  imaginative, high­quality independent booksellers. Much book buying has also gravitated to the internet   Wild success of Harry Potter book series hold several lesson for media literate readers  Chapter 6  Zoopraxiscope: Machine for projecting slides onto distant surface  Persistence of vision: Images our eyes gather are retained in brain for about 1/24 of a second  Kinetograph: Film all types of theatrical performances   Daguerreotype: Process of recording images on polished nail plates, covered with thin layer of silver iodide  emulsion  Calotype: Used translucent paper, which several prints could be made  Kinetoscope: Accompanied by music through a phonograph   Cinematographe: Device that both photographed and projected action  Montage: Tying together two separate but related shots in such a way they took on a new, unified meaning  Nickelodeons: Small theatres up to 100 seats  Factory studios: Production companies  Double feature: Combining a blockbuster with a less popular movie called a B­Movie  Vertical Integration: Studios produced their own films, distributed them through their own outlets, and exhibited  them in their own theatres  Block booking: Practice of requiring exhibitors to rent groups of movies, often inferior to secure better one   Three component system of Film Industry − Production: Making of movies − Distribution: Supplying movies to TV networks, cable and satellite networks, makers of videodiscs, and  Internet streaming companies  Green light process: Decision to make picture in first place  Platform rollout: To open movie on few screens and how that critical response, film festival  success, and good word­of­mouth reviews from those who do see it will propel it to success − Exhibition: Movie theatres  Corporate independents: Corporations that produce films that have the feeling of an indie film  Blockbuster mentality: Filmmaking characterized by reduced risk taking and more formulaic movies  Concept lines: Movies that can be described in one line  Tentpole: Expensive blockbuster around which studio plans its other releases  Franchise films: Movies that are produced with full intention of producing several more sequels   Theatrical films: Films produced originally for theatre exhibition  Microcinema: Filmmakers using digital video cameras and desktop digital editing machines  Film’s beginnings reside in efforts of entrepreneurs such as Eadweard Muybridge and inventors like Thomas  Edison and William Dickson   Photography, essential precursor to movies, was developed by Hannibal Goodwin, George Eastman, Joseph  Nicephore Niepce, Louis Daguerre, and William Henry Fox Talbot   Edison and Lumiere brothers began commercial motion picture exhibition, little more than representations of  everyday life. Georges Melies added narrative; Edwin S. Porter added montage, and DW Griffith developed full  length feature film th  Movies became big business at turn of 20  century, one dominated by big studios, but change soon came in form  of talkies, scandal and control, and new genres to fend off depression   Studios are at heart of movie business and are increasingly in control of three component systems. There are major,  corporate independents, and independent studios  Conglomeration and concentration affect movie industry, leading to blockbuster mentality  Convergence is reshaping industry, promising to alter structure and economics   Media literate moviegoers should be aware of inclusion of product placements in films and their potential  influence on medium  Chapter 7  Liquid barretter: First audio device permitting reception of wireless voices  Audion tube: Vacuum tube that improved and amplified wireless signals  Trustee model: In broadcast regulation, idea that broadcasters serve as public’s trustees or fiduciaries   Spectrum scarcity: Broadcast spectrum space is limited, so not everyone who wants to broadcast can  Affiliates: Broadcasting station that aligns itself with network  O&Os: Owned and operated by  Fundamental basis of broadcasting in US was set: − Radio broadcasters were private, commercially owned enterprises, rather than government operations − Governmental regulation was based on public interest − Stations were licensed to serve specific localities, but national networks programmed most lucrative  hours with largest audiences  − Entertainment and information were basic broadcast content − Advertising formed basis of financial support for broadcasting   Low Power FM (LPFM): 859 of them in the nation  Format: Radio station’s particular sound or programming content   Secondary services: Offering a different format at certain times of the day  Playlist: Predetermined sequence of selected records  Billings: Income earned from sale of airtime   Deregulation: Relaxation of ownership and other rules for radio and TV  Duopoly: One person or company owning and managing multiple radio stations in single market   Four major recording companies − Sony BMG − Warner Music Group − Universal Music Group − EMI Records  Catalog albums: In record retailing, albums more than 3 years old  Recent catalog albums: In record retailing, albums out for 15 months to 3 years  Syndication: Sale of radio or television content to stations on market­by­market basis   DMX (Digital Music Express): Home delivery of audio by cable   Digital audio radio service (DARS): Direct home or automobile delivery of audio by satellite   Terrestrial digital radio: Allows broadcasters to transmit not only their usually analog signal  In­band­on­channel: Relying on digital compression technology  Web Radio: Delivery of “radio” directly to individual listeners over the Internet  Podcasting: Recording and downloading audio files stored on servers  Bitcasters: Web­only radio stations  Streaming: Simultaneous downloading and accessing of digital audio or video data   Digital recording: Sound went from being preserved as waves to 1s and 0s logged in millisecond intervals in  computerized translation process  MP3: Compression software that shrinks audio files to less than a 10  of their original size  Modems: Users began to hook up to the Internet faster  Open source software: Freely downloaded software  P2P: Peer­to­Peer downloading, other form of downloading is industry­approved   BitTorrent: File sharing software that allows anonymous users to create swarms of data as they simultaneously  download and upload “bits” of given piece of content from countless, untraceable servers   Copyright: Protecting content creators’ financial interest in their product  Guglielmo Marconi’s radio allowed long­distance wireless communication  Reginald Fessenden’s liquid barretter made possible transmission of voices  Lee DeForest’s audition tube permitted reliable transmission of voices and music  Thomas Edison developed first sound recording device, fact now in debate  Emile Berliner’s gramophone improved on it as it permitted multiple copies to be made from a master recording  Radio Acts of 1910, 1912, and 1927 and Communications Act of 1934 eventually resulted in FCC and trustee  model of broadcast regulation  Advertising and network structure of broadcasting came to radio in 1920s, producing medium’s golden age, one  drawn to close by coming of TV  Radio stations are classified as commercial and noncommercial, AM and FM  Deregulation has allowed concentration of ownership of radio into hands of relatively small number of companies  Four major recording companies control 60% of world’s recorded music market  Convergence has come to radio in form of satellite and cable deliver of radio, terrestrial digital radio, Web radio,  podcasting, and streaming from social network sites   Digital technology, in form of Internet creation, promotion, and distribution of music, legal and illegal  downloading from Internet, and mobile phone downloading, promises to reshape nature of recording industry  Shock jocks pose vexing problem for media literate listeners—are they signs of our culture’s coarseness of forum  of contesting of culture  Chapter 8  Nonlinear TV: Watching TV on our own schedules, not on some cable or broadcast programmer’s   Nipkow disc: Consisted of rotating scanning disc spinning in front of photoelectric cell  Pixels: Picture dots   Iconoscope Tube: First practical TV camera tube  Kinescope: Improved picture tube  Changes during the decade − TV genres carried over many different genres from radio like variety shows, sitcoms, soap operas, quiz  shows and dramas − 2 new formats: Feature films and talk shows − TV news and documentary remade broadcast journalism  − AT&T completed network of distribution of TV programming to US so all could see major programming  Coaxial cable: Copper­clad aluminum wire encased in plastic foam insulation, covered by  aluminum outer conductor, and then sheathed in plastic   Microwave relay: Audio and video transmitting system in which super­high­frequency signals  are sent from land­based point to land­based point  Spot commercial sales: Selling individual 60­second spots on given program to wide variety of adverti
More Less

Related notes for COMMUN 2100

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit