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Chapter 8

SW 312 Chapter Notes - Chapter 8: John Wiley & Sons, Institute For Operations Research And The Management Sciences, Class Discrimination


Department
Social Work
Course Code
SW 312
Professor
Richard Tyler- Walker, Jr.
Chapter
8

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Chapter 8: Barriers to Effective Multicultural Clinical Practice
Traditional social work and mental health services are imbued with monocultural
assumptions and practices that disadvantage, or deny equal access and opportunity to,
culturally diverse groups
Some problematic characteristics are:
Culture-bound values
Class-bound values
Language barriers
oThere is overlap between these three main categories
Barriers challenge social workers to
oReach out to and understand the worldviews, cultural values, and life
circumstances of their culturally diverse clients
oFree themselves from the cultural conditioning that informs what they believe to
be appropriate helping strategies
oDevelop new and culturally sensitive methods of intervention
oPlay new roles outside of that of a conventional psychotherapist in the helping
process
Linguistic barriers often place culturally diverse clients at a disadvantage
Generic Characteristics of Counseling and Therapy
All theories of counseling and therapy are constructed based on theorists’ assumptions
concerning the goals for therapy, the methodology used to invoke change, and the
definition of healthy and unhealthy functioning
Social work counseling and therapy have traditionally been conceptualized in Western,
individualistic terms
Most theories share certain common components of White culture in the values and
beliefs they reflect
Counseling and therapy are used mainly with middle- and upper-class segments of the
population
oCulturally diverse clients do not share many of the values and characteristics seen
in both the goals and the process of therapy
Sue, D. W., Rasheed, M. N., & Rasheed, J. M. (2016). Barriers to effective multicultural
clinical practice. Multicultural social work practice. (pp. 209-239).
Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
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Schofield noted that mental health professionals tend to prefer clients who exhibit the
YAVIS syndrome:
oYoung, attractive, verbal, intelligent, and successful.
oSundberg sarcastically pointed out that counseling is not for QUOID people:
Quiet, ugly, old, indigent, and dissimilar culturally
Three primary characteristics of clinical practice that may be a source of conflict for
culturally diverse clients were identified in the early 1970s:
oSocial work clinicians often expect their clients to exhibit some degree of
openness, psychological-mindedness, or sophistication.
oDirect social work practice is traditionally a one-to-one activity that encourages
clients to talk about the most intimate aspects of their lives
Individuals who fail in or resist self-disclosure may be seen as resistant,
defensive, or superficial
oThe social work helping relationship is often an ambiguous one
The client is encouraged to discuss problems while the social worker
listens and responds
This forces the client to be the primary active participant
Culture-Bound Values
Culture: all those things that people have learned in their history to od, believe, value,
and enjoy
oThe totality of ideals, beliefs, skills, tools, customs, and institutions into which
each member of a society is born
Marginal person: refers to a person who has been unable to form dual ethnic
identification because of bicultural membership
Focus on the individual
oMost forms of counseling and psychotherapy tend to be individual centered
oU.S. society and culture are based on the concept of individualism and that
competition between individuals for status, recognition, achievement, and so forth
forms the basis for Western tradition
oIndividualism, autonomy, and becoming your own person are perceived as
healthy and desirable goals
Sue, D. W., Rasheed, M. N., & Rasheed, J. M. (2016). Barriers to effective multicultural
clinical practice. Multicultural social work practice. (pp. 209-239).
Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
find more resources at oneclass.com
find more resources at oneclass.com
You're Reading a Preview

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