Textbook Notes (367,752)
United States (205,876)
Biology (199)
BIOL 2299 (6)
Chapter

Unit 5.docx

3 Pages
39 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Biology
Course
BIOL 2299
Professor
Gail Begley
Semester
Fall

Description
Jonathan Olson Unit 5 Evolution 5.1 Introduction to Evolution • Evolution – the change over time in allele frequencies in a population • Darwin’s theory was revolutionary because  o It overturned the idea that all species are immutable o Instead of regarding species as static types, it emphasized the importance  of variations among organisms within the same species and population o Unlike special creation, it allowed scientists to make testable predictions  to evaluate through observation and experimentation, a key feature to any  scientific idea  He proposed a “unity of life”, in that all organisms are descendants  from a common ancestor • Natural selection o Is backed up by:   Direct observation • Antibiotic resistance • Galapagos finches have noticeable changes in beak and  body size  Morphological and genetic homologies • Homologies – similarities that organisms share because  they inherited them from a common ancestor  Vestigial traits  The fossil record • Used to develop phylogeny – the evolutionary history of a  group of organisms • Radiometric dating – the measurement of radioactive  isotopes that decay to other, detectable isotopes of elements 5.2 The Darwinian Revolution • Uniformitarianism – the theory that observable processes occurring at a constant  rate in the present have always been in progress and can explain the formation of  all geologic features over great time periods • 'In October 1838, that is, fifteen months after I had begun my systematic inquiry, I  happened to read for amusement Malthus on Population, and being well prepared  to appreciate the struggle for existence which everywhere goes on from long­ continued observation of the habits of animals and plants, it at once struck me that  under these circumstances favorable variations would tend to be preserved, and  unfavorable ones to be destroyed. The results of this would be the formation of a  new species. Here, then I had at last got a theory by which to work.' — Charles  Darwin, from his autobiography (1876). • Biogeography – the study of the geographical distribution of species • Noted how ancestral relationships were based more on biogeographical patterns  than on overt characteristics [Type text] [Type text] [Type text] • Descent with modification – how species change over time, based on favoritism  expressed by the environment, towards traits expressed in individuals
More Less

Related notes for BIOL 2299

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit