Carl Gustav Jung worksheet.docx

7 Pages
151 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Religious Studies
Course
RELSTDS 4972
Professor
Sarah Iles Johnston
Semester
Spring

Description
Carl Gustav Jung (1875­1961) I. Background A. Mentors/training/intellectual tradition  Jung was born in the village of Kesswil, Switzerland and was the son of a  Lutheran minister. [ER 5031]  He took a medical degree from the University of Basel in 1902. [ER 5031]  He saw psychiatry as the combination of his scientific and humanistic interests,  Jung joined the staff of the Burghölzli, the psychiatric clinic of the University of  Zurich; where he worked under Eugen Blueler [ER 5031]  In 1903 he married Emma Rauschenbach and moved to Küsnacht, off the shore of  Lake Zurich, where he spent the rest of his life. [ER 5031]  In 1900 after Sigmund Freud published, The Interpretation of Dreams, and began  to attract a talented following. Among the most gifted was Jung. [ER 5031]  The two met in 1906, and for the next seven years Jung’s life was shaped almost  entirely by his relationship with Freud. The two became intimate friends and  corresponded extensively. [ER 5031]  Jung initially concluded that Freud’s theories of the unconscious, dreams,  childhood conflicts, and psychological illnesses (neuroses) were essentially  correct, and he adopted them in his own psychiatric work. [ER 5031]  Jung maintained that he could discern a religious dimension in psychoanalysis,  whereas Freud insisted that the basis of psychoanalysis was entirely scientific.  [ER 5031]  In 1913 he broke ties with Freud, resigned from his teaching post at the  University of Zurich and withdrew from the International Psychoanalytic  Association. He had left the Burghölzli in 1909. [ER 5031]  Having made these breaks, Jung entered a period of intense inner stress during  which he was beset by disturbing fantasies, visions, and dreams. For the next  several years he occupied himself with analyzing the products of his own mind.  [ER 5031]  In addition to psychotherapy, two subjects of special interest to him were Western  religion and the moral failures of modern society. [ER 5031] B. Principal geographical and historical concerns  Western religion within modern society  Primitives and ancients: “Both primitives and ancients are religious, and overtly  so. [ER 5033]  By ancients – an admittedly imprecise term of this author’s – is meant religious  people up through the present, including not only ancient Sumerian, Egyptian, and  Greek religions but also Judaism, Christianity, Islam and Hinduism. [ER 5033]  Rationalists and romantics: “By contrast, neither rationalists nor romantics are  religious.” [ER 5033] C. Principal thematic concerns  No one psychologized religion more relentlessly than he. [ER 5032]  Stages of psychological growth into which he divides humanity. [ER 5033] D. Attitude toward modern culture  “Man in the crowd is unconsciously lowered to an inferior moral and intellectual  level, to that level which is always there, below the threshold of consciousness,  ready to break forth as soon as it is stimulated through the formation of a crowd”  [CGJ 16]  “Since those days Protestantism has become a hotbed of schisms and, at the same  time, of a rapid increase of science and technics which attracted human  consciousness to such an extent that it forgot the unaccountable forces of the  unconscious mind. The catastrophe of the Great War and the subsequent  extraordinary manifestations of a profound mental disturbance were needed to  arouse a doubt that everything was well with the white man’s mind. When the war  broke out we had been quite certain that the world could be righted by rational  means.” [CGJ 58]  “Now we behold the amazing spectacle of States taking over the age­old claim of  theocracy, that is, of totality, inevitably accompanied by suppression of free  opinion. We again see people cutting each other’s throats to support childish  theories of how to produce paradise on earth. It is not very difficult to see that the  powers of the underworld – not to say of hell – which were formerly more or less  successfully chained and made serviceable in a gigantic mental edifice, are now  creating, or trying to create, a State slavery and a State prison devoid of any  mental or spiritual charm.” [CGJ 58­9]  “But one thing is certain – that modern man, Protestant or not, has lost the  protection of the ecclesiastical walls carefully erected and reinforced since Roman  days, and on account of that loss has approached the zone of world­destroying and  world­creating fire.” [CGJ 59]  “Our world is permeated by waves of restlessness and fear.” [CGJ 59] II. Method/Mode of Operation A. Sources  Patients  Introspection  Academic research B. Categories  Primitives, ancients, rationalists, romantics  Collective unconscious  Archetypes  Complexes  Symbolism  Quaternity C. Comparison  Patient case studies (dreams, neuroses, approaches to therapy)  Religious traditions (Monotheistic, Polytheistic, Animistic mythologies)  Secular traditions (faith in the “myth” of science) D. Methodology  Dream analysis and comparison  Analytic psychology 
More Less

Related notes for RELSTDS 4972

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit