EB Tylor worksheet.docx

5 Pages
69 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Religious Studies
Course
RELSTDS 4972
Professor
Sarah Iles Johnston
Semester
Spring

Description
E. B. Tylor (1832­1917) I. Background A.  Mentors/training/intellectual tradition  Edward Burnett Tylor was born into the Quaker community in London on October 2,  1832. [ER 9424]  Both Parents were members of the Society of Friends. [ER 9424]  English Anthropologist.  Henry Christy became first mentor, in 1856 Tylor wrote his first book, Anahuac, or  Mexico and the Mexicans, Ancient and Modern (1861)  No university education however awarded an honorary doctorate from Oxford  University in 1875.  Most notable works include, Researches into the Early History of Mankind (1865)  and the more popular, Primitive Culture (2 vols., 1871)  “Evolutionist” approach provided a linear model of progression to explain the origin  of religion.  Greatest contribution was his work on animism within religious studies of indigenous  and archaic cultures.  Hegel – positive end, humanity will reach its perfect state. B.  Principal geographical and historical concerns  His anthropological theories centered on the origin of religion.  Wrote several books during the rise of science, objectivity and social theories such as  evolution during the 19  century.  Primarily interested in the evolution of religion, using Western Europe as the apex of  religious evolution.  Product of his own environment. (The Industrial Revolution) C.  Principal thematic concerns  Evolutionist theories of religion’s origin hold in common a presupposed “psychic  unity of mathind” [ER 2913]  Shares a 19  century enthusiasm for developmental schemata that find their bases in  what might loosely be called a philosophy of history. [ER 2913]  Intellectualized, or “armchair” approach to answering these questions. D.  Attitude toward modern culture  E.B. Tylor viewed how religion was practiced in modern western culture as the  highest form of religion.  Modern culture is morally “correct”.  Animism, Polydaemonism, Polytheism, Monotheism  “Thus if monotheism prevails today in Western Europe, the belief in many spirits  must have been a very early condition, polytheism being a less enlightened stage than  belief in one God.” [C 8] II. Method/Mode of Operation A. Sources  Evolutionary theories of his time.   “What did they substitute for fact? The answer is, schemes, analogies, and  assumptions, all overlaid with rich imagination.” [C 7]  “Another method was through the use of so­called survivals­ “processes, customs,  opinions, and so forth, which have been carried on by force of habit into a new state  of society different from that in which they had their original home, and thus they  remain proofs and examples of an older condition of culture out of which a newer  had been evolved.” (Tylor, 1873) [C 7]  Comparison method or “evidences” from tribes all over the world were taken out of  context and arranged in a sequential scheme. B. Categories  Primitive culture – indigenous tribes both contemporary and historical.  Modern culture – Western Europe and North America.  Animism – belief in spirits that make up the elements, directions, and even the  cosmos, rocks, trees, animals, water, sky, fire, “the dead”.  Polytheism – belief in plural gods, with an occasional “high God”.  Monotheism – belief in one God. C. Comparison  Indigenous tribes found throughout the world, compared to one another and to  Western Europe and North America.  Various customs found in societies that aided to survival. D. Methodology  Comparison method  Survival analysis  “Intellectual” approach  Naturism explanation  Theological approach III. Theory/Presuppositions A. Definition of “religion”  “The first requisite in a systematic study of the religions of the lower races is to lay  down a rudimentary definition of religion. By requiring in this definition the belief in  a supreme deity or of a 
More Less

Related notes for RELSTDS 4972

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit