Rudolf Otto Notes.docx

4 Pages
47 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Religious Studies
Course
RELSTDS 4972
Professor
Sarah Iles Johnston
Semester
Spring

Description
Chapter One: The Rational and the Non­rational This bias to rationalization still prevails, not only in theology but also in the science of  comparative religion in general, and from top to bottom of it. The modern students of  mythology, and those who pursue research into the religion of ‘primitive man’ and  attempt to reconstruct the ‘bases’ or ‘sources’ of religion, are all victims to it. [RO 3] But it is rather a matter for astonishment than for admiration! For if there be any single  domain of human experience that presents us with something unmistakably specific and  unique, peculiar to itself, assuredly is that of the religious life. [RO 4] In truth the enemy has often a keener vision in this matter than either the champion of  religion or the neutral and professedly impartial theorist. For the adversaries on their side  know very well that the entire ‘pother about mysticism’ has nothing to do with ‘reason’  and ‘rationality’. [RO 4] And so it is salutary that we should be incited to notice that religion is not exclusively  contained and exhaustively comprised in any series of ‘rational’ assertions; and it is well  worth while to attempt to bring the relation of the different ‘moments’ of religion to one  another clearly before the mind, so that its nature may become more manifest. [RO 4] Chapter Two: ‘Numen’ and the “Numinous’ We generally take ‘holy’ as meaning ‘completely good’; it is the absolute moral attribute,  denoting the consummation of moral goodness. (…But this common usage of the term is  inaccurate.) [RO 5] Nor is this merely a later or acquired meaning; rather, ‘holy’, or at least the equivalent  words in latin and greek, in semitic and other ancient languages, denoted first and  foremost only this overplus: if the ethical element was present at all, at any rate it was not  original and never constituted the whole meaning of the word. [RO 5] Chapter Three: The elements in the ‘Numinous’ To be rapt in worship is one thing; to be morally uplifted by the contemplation of a good  deed is another; and it is not to their common features, but to those elements of emotional  content peculiar to the first that we would have attention directed as precisely as possible. When Abraham ventures to plead with God for the men of Sodom, he says (gen. xviii.  27): ‘Behold now, I have taken upon me to speak unto the Lord, which am but dust and  ashes.’ There you have a self confessed ‘feeling of dependence’, which is yet at the same  time far more than, and something other than, merely a feeling of dependence. Desiring  to give it a name of its own, I propose to call it ‘creature­conciousness’ or creature­ feeling. It is the emotion of a creature, submerged and overwhelmed by its own  nothingness in contrast to that which is supreme above all creatures. [RO 9­10] Chapter Four: Mysterium Tremendum Before going on to consider the elements which unfold as the ‘tremendum’ develops, let  us give a little further consideration to the first crude, primitive forms which this  ‘numinous dread’ or awe shows itself. It is the mark which really characterizes the so­ called ‘religion of primitive man’, and there it appears as ‘daemonic dread’. This crudely  naïve and primordial emotional disturbance, and the fantastic images to which it gives  rise, are later overborne and ousted more highly developed forms of the numinous  emotion, with all its mysteriously impelling power. [RO 15­6] We have been attempting to unfold the implications of that aspect of the mysterium  tremendum indicated by the adjective, and the result so far may be summarized in two  words, constituting, as before, what may be called an ‘ideogram’, rather than a concept  proper, viz. ‘absolute unapproachablilit
More Less

Related notes for RELSTDS 4972

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit