Victor Turner worksheet.docx

7 Pages
130 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Religious Studies
Course
RELSTDS 4972
Professor
Sarah Iles Johnston
Semester
Spring

Description
Victor Turner: (1920­1983) I. Background A. Mentors/training/intellectual tradition  Scottish­born American anthropologist and comparative religionist. [ER 9405]  Turner was born in Glasgow, Scotland. [ER 9405]  In 1943, in the midst of his five years of military service, he married Edith Davis,  who was to collaborate with him in field research and writing through his career.  [ER 9405]  B.A. degree with honors in anthropology in 1949 from the University of London;  where he studied with leading figures of sctructural­functionalism: A. R.  Radcliffe­Brown, Meyer Fortes, Raymond Firth, and Edmund Leach. [ER 9405]  Graduate study at the University of Manchester under Max Gluckman and was  introduced to conflict theory and political anthropology. [ER 9405]  During 1950­1954 he was a research officer at the Rhodes­Livingstone Institute in  Lusaka, Zambia (then Northern Rhodesia), where he undertook, with his wife, a  two­and­a­half­year study of the Ndembu people. [ER 9405]  1954 he returned to the University of Manchester and became a lecturer and then  senior lecturer of social anthropology. [ER 9405]  From 1963 to 1968 he was a professor of anthropology at Cornell University, and  from 1968 to 1977 he was professor of anthropology and social thought at the  University of Chicago. [ER 9405]  One of these studies, The Drums of Affliction (1968), became the locus classicus  of later scholarship in the field of African medical anthropology. [ER 9405]  From 1977 until his death he was the William R. Kenan Professor of  Anthropology at the University of Virginia. [ER 9405]  He held numerous fellowships, visiting appointments, and distinguished  lectureships at universities in the United States and around the world. [ER 9405]  He organized major international conferences and was editor of the important  series, “Symbol, Myth and Ritual” published by Cornell University Press. [ER  9405]  Together with the drama theorist and director Richard Schechner, Turner  understood theater to be an important means of communicating a society’s self­ reflections and a means of cross­cultural understanding. [ER 9407]  Near the end of his life, he became interested in the subject of the neurobiology of  ritual. [ER 9407] B. Principal geographical and historical concerns  Central Africa, Ndembu village life.  Mexican, Spanish, Irish Christian pilgrimages.  Modern society.  Experimental performance theatre during the late 1960’s and early 1970’s. C. Principal thematic concerns  Turner’s fundamental conviction that it was in the dynamics and dramatics of  social, ritual, and theatrical events that one came to understand the lives of others  and oneself. [ER 9407] D. Attitude toward modern culture  His subsequent search for liminality in the modern secular world led to his use of  the word liminoid to represent the nonreligious genres of art, sport, and  performance.  His final studies led him into the field of performance theory. In theater,  especially experimental theater in the United States in the late 1960s and early  1970s, Turner saw the same kind of liminal reflexivity, the public cognizance of  social situations, that he encountered in rituals associated with the redressive  phase of Ndembu social dramas. II. Method/Mode of Operation A. Sources  Ethnographies  Nuerobiology  Theatre  Academic research / theories B. Categories  Liminality (individual, social, historical): The intermediate or marginal ritual  phase; the autonomous condition of being betwixt and between behavior; the  crucial, powerful, strange and transformative, phase of the ritual process. [Lindsay  Jones]  Communitas: The collective experience of liminality; an experience of intense  human unity or togetherness, characterized by social equality; suspension of usual  status and economic distinction – generic human. [Lindsay Jones]  Betwixt and Between C. Comparison  Cross­cultural  Normal vs. Disturbance D. Methodology  Turner called his analytical method “dramatistic,” because, like Freud, he  believed that examination of disturbances of the normal and the regular often  gives greater insight into the normal than does direct study. [ER 9406]  Ethnography  One has to proceed atomistically and piecemeal from “blaze” to “blaze,”  “beacon” to “beacon,” if one is properly to follow the indigenous mode of  thinking. It is only when the symbolic path from the unknown to the known is  completed tha
More Less

Related notes for RELSTDS 4972

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit