Textbook Notes (368,875)
United States (206,132)
Sociology (4)
SOC-113 (4)
Clarke (4)
Chapter

Newman.docx

4 Pages
35 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Sociology
Course
SOC-113
Professor
Clarke
Semester
Fall

Description
Newman: downward mobility (micro sociology)  Downward Mobility:  o We don’t hear about it often, because it doesn’t happen very  drastically, but it does happen.  o When we hear about it, we don’t want to think or talk about it,  because it’s negative, it’s a failure, the opposite of the American dream.  o We don’t like to talk about things we don’t understand or have language to  express.  o It’s like cancer, which used to be a hush­hush thing, even though it’s not  contagious, people with it wouldn’t be social because of it. Now we have the  Internet and we can better understand it, and it has been incorporated into our  everyday language.  o Downward Mobility has not been incorporated into our everyday language, and  it’s often confused with poverty.  o These people don’t hit poverty, but they are accustomed to a lifestyle they can no  longer obtain.  o They may regain employment, but cannot purchase or manage debt/financial  commitments they were accustomed to.  o Divorced women make much less because they were homemakers before (they  lack skill and experience needed). Their social classes drop.  o After managers’ job loss, they either got closer to their children because they had  more time to spend with them or the kids looked down on their fathers. This  varied by:  o Age. The younger child adapts, the older had it and lost it.  o Gender. Boys wanted their dads to be men. Girls wanted their moms to  help. o Information. What children knew, how much of it they understood­  (Cognitive­ what’s going on and how you interpret it.) o Reagan fired air traffic controllers for striking. It was a long process to  become one and their skills did not qualify them for any other jobs. Their  experience wouldn’t transfer over. They only blamed Reagan, and didn’t  take responsibility for their job loses. The strike was illegal, but they saw  it as justifiable. They compared it to the Civil Rights Movement. They  challenged if the law was right.  o The divorced women’s downward mobility was not related to the  economy. They lost their status as a wife Collectively vs. Individually:  o Businessmen (middle managers) lost jobs individually.  o Air traffic controllers (strike) lost jobs collectively when Reagan fired them.  o Factory workers lost jobs collectively when their factories closed.  o Divorced women experienced downward mobility on a very individual basis.  o The degree to which they thought about their downward mobility depended on  how it happened. Everyone lost something:  o Statuses,  o Occupation,  o An aspect of their identities,  o Status in family and communities,  o (Divorced women lost) their families.  • Downward Mobility is like a cultural vacuum. No one wants to think or talk about  it.  • Recession: we go through business cycles. When it is good, wages are high and  there are a lot of jobs. High wages=high prices. We can no longer sustain it.  • Demographic: baby boomers­ the generation before was smaller, so they were  trying to fit more people into a smaller space.  o Economic security=more babies • Divorce: women were paid less, lower status jobs. Divorce rates went up and  there was a lack of job security.  • Industrialization and post­industrial society:  o Changing the type of job availability. o Post­Industrialization: In a service economy, there are low and high jobs.  The middle jobs are non­existent. Elite and service job availability.  o Industrialization: In a production/manufacturing economy, there are  more service jobs, less middle jobs, and even less elite jobs. (Union)  Theory: a set of related propositions about any observable reality not necessarily fact, but  our conclusions. We may test it over and over before we really can suggest it as a fact.  (3 grand theories grand to sociology):  Structural Functionalism:  • why are societies are arranged the way they are?  • Why do we do things in the patterns we do?  • Explaining why we have institutions that do things a particular way: one  generation teaches and convinces the next that their way is the best.  • Institutions have functions, which are arranged the way they are so they can  function for societies so that:  o Societies can accomplish their national goals and adapt to a changing  environment. (Natural changes and other society changes) o Allow societies to reduce tension (internal change) o Recruit individuals to patterned­social roles (keep having babies).  Conflict Theory: • An answer to structural functionalism. • They argue the overall part is the maintenance of relationships of inequality.  • Most social relations are base
More Less

Related notes for SOC-113

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit