Textbook Notes (368,566)
United States (206,084)
Astronomy (5)
AST-0010 (5)
Chapter 3

Chapter 3.docx

9 Pages
86 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Astronomy
Course
AST-0010
Professor
Kenneth R.Lang
Semester
Fall

Description
Chapter 3 04/15/2014 ATMOSPHERES, MAGNETOSPHERES, AND THE SOLAR WIND The invisible buffer zone with space  Air is invisible Magnetic fields are invisible but they deflect charged particles Suns perpetual winds are invisible – means that interplanetary space is not empty  3.1 FUNDAMENTALS WHAT IS AN ATMOSPHERE? Consists of gas particles that move faster when hotter Gas expands when it is hot A planet’s gravity holds the moving gas particles close to the planet’s surface WHERE DO ATMOSPHERES COME FROM? For terrestrial planets Atmospheres supplied by volcanoes from inside Atmospheres supplied by comets and asteroids from outside  Giant planets retain their primeval (primitive) atmospheres  PRESSURE AND TEMPERATURE Gas pressure increases with the temperature  Planets are hotter if closer to the sun, colder if farther away  GLOBAL WARMING BY THE GREENHOUSE EFFECT Terrestrial planet’s surfaces can increase when atmosphere traps heat near surface  Heat trapping gases: CO  a2d H O 2 LOSING AN ATMOSPHERE An atmosphere’s composition depends on the temperature of the planet, the mass of gas molecule, and the  mass of the planet A molecule can leave a planet when its thermal velocity exceeds the planet’s escape velocity The speed of molecule motion increases with temperature and decreases with molecule mass (molecules  move faster when hotter and lighter)  Harder to hold on to a faster molecule Gravity of planet increases with mass  Easier to hold on to atmosphere if planet is more massive  Jeans escape: atmosphere slowly leaks out from the top of the atmosphere where gravity is less than lower  down  Maxwell­Boltzmann speed distribution means that some molecules move faster than others (statistical) 3.2 ATMOSPHERES OF TERRESTRIAL PLANETS Terrestrial planets: relatively low mass, hot since relatively close to sun  PLANET     SURFACE TEMP    SURFACE PRESSURE   MAIN GAS Mercury      90­740 K            Earth          288­293 K             1 Bar               2   2        N , O Venus         735 K                    92 Bar              2           CO Mars           140­300 K             0.01 Bar              2        CO 0 K = motion stops 273 K = water freezes 373 K = water boils EARTH’S UNIQUE ATMOSPHERE Atmosphere protects, ventilates, and incubates us 77% nitrogen (N 2  21% oxygen (O )2– from plants  Sky is blue because air molecules preferentially/specially scatter blue sunlight  Atmosphere’s surface pressure is 1 Bar  Surface temperature is 288 K to 293 K  EARTH’S CLIMATE AND WEATHER Sun’s heat not equally distributed – climate differences Continuous, global circulation of atmosphere (attempt to equalize global temperature differences) High­temperature air in equatorial regions circulates towards colder airs  Colder air moves away to replace warm air  Movement of air = winds  Winds attempt to balance pressure differences because increased temperature creates higher pressure Trade winds Convergence of near­surface air currents along the equator Blow mainly from east to west almost daily  Jet streams High­altitude winds that blow eastwards  Speeds of up to 40 m/s   VENUS ATMOSPHERE Hot and heavy 96% carbon dioxide (CO2) Surface pressure is 92 Bars Surface temperature is 735 K MARS ATMOSPHERE Cold and thin  95% carbon dioxide (CO ) 2 Surface pressure is 0.01 Bar Surface temperature is 140 K to 300 K EXOSPHERES OF MERCURY AND EARTH’S MOON Tenuous, variable shroud (cover) of hydrogen, helium, sodium, and potassium atoms  Low density of atoms per cubic meter Rarefied gas ▯ surface pressure = trillionth of Earth’s surface pressure (gases not colliding) Gases always escaping, not bound by gravity ▯ why it’s an exosphere and not an atmosphere Atoms chipped off their surface by micrometeorites, sunlight, or solar wind particles  EVOLUTION OF THE TERRESTRIAL PLANETARY ATMOSPHERES Venus Runaway 
More Less

Related notes for AST-0010

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit