Textbook Notes (368,125)
United States (205,946)
Biology (140)
BIO-0013 (28)
Chapter

3.2, 3.3 Book Notes.docx

3 Pages
90 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Biology
Course
BIO-0013
Professor
Michelle Gaudette
Semester
Fall

Description
Sept 14, 2013 3.2 Primary Structure – the sequence of amino acids in a polypeptide • There are 20  different combinations of amino acid residues for a polymer with a given  length of n • Important because it determines which R groups are in the polypeptide, which determines  shape and reactivity of the protein • Primary structure determines secondary, tertiary, and quaternary structures Secondary Structure – folding due to hydrogen bonding between components of peptide–bonded  backbone • Are distinctively shaped sections of proteins that are stabilized largely by hydrogen  bonding that occurs between the oxygen on the C=O group of one amino acid residue and  the hydrogen on the N­H groups of another o Hydrogen bonding between sections of the same backbone is possible only when  a polypeptide bends in a way that puts the C=O and N­H groups close together  o α­helix: backbone is coiled o β – pleated sheet: segments of a peptide chain bend 180° and then fold in the  same plane o When biologists use illustrations called ribbon diagrams to represent the shape of  a protein, α­helices are shown as coils; β­pleated sheets are shown by groups of  arrows in a plane o Certain amino acids are more likely to be involved in α­helices than in β­pleated  sheets, and vice versa, due to the specific geometry of their side chains o The large number of hydrogen bonds in these structures makes them highly  stable, increasing the stability of the molecule as a whole and helping define its  shape o In both structures, the distance between residues that hydrogen­bond to one  another is small Tertiary Structure – most of the overall (3D) shape of a polypeptide, resulting from interactions  between R­groups or between R­groups and the backbone • Uses a variety of linkages o Hydrogen bonding – form between polar R­groups and opposite partial charges  either in the peptide backbone or other R­groups o Hydrophobic interactions – in an aqueous solution, water molecules interact with  the hydrophilic polar side chains of a polypeptide and force the hydrophobic  nonpolar side chains to coalesce into globular masses.  When these nonpolar R­ groups come together, the surrounding water molecules form more hydrogen  bonds with each other, increasing the stability of their own interactions o van der Waals interactions – weak electrical attractions that stabilize hydrophobic  interactions   Occur because the constant motion of electrons gives molecules a tiny  asymmetry in charge that changes with time; if nonpolar molecules get  extremely close to each other, the minute partial charge on one molecule  induces an opposite partial charge in the nearby molecule and causes an  attraction  Very weak relative to covalent bonds or even hydrogen bonds, but a large  number can significantly increase the stability of a structure 
More Less

Related notes for BIO-0013

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit