Textbook Notes (368,728)
United States (206,099)
Psychology (61)
PSY-0001 (33)
Chapter 11

chap 11 reading.docx

7 Pages
43 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSY-0001
Professor
Sam Sommers
Semester
Fall

Description
04/15/2014 11.1  Learning Objectives Discuss the goals of health psychology  Describe the biopsychosocial model of health Identify behaviors that contribute to the leading causes of death in industrialized societies Describe the placebo effect Can Psychosocial Factors Affect Health? Biopsychosocial Model of Health incorporates multiple perspectives for understanding and improving health Describes the reciprocal and multiple influences of biological factors, behavioral factors, and social factors  on health In contrast to the traditional medical model, the model maintains that people are active participants in  determining their health outcomes Behavior contributes to the leading causes of death The leading causes of death in industrialized societies are influenced by our behaviors Lifestyle variables (overeating, poor diet, smoking, and lack of exercise) contribute to heart disease, the  leading cause of death in the US Teenagers and young adults are most likely to die from accidents, homicide, and suicide – often  preventable Placebos can be powerful medicine Can have powerful effects on health and well­being Effective only if the person taking it believes in its ability to improve health Placebos may activate the same neural process as biologically active treatments  Terms Health psychology: a field that integrates research on health and on psychology; it involves the  application of psychological principles to promote health and well­being Well­being: a positive state that includes striving for optimal health and life satisfaction  Biopsychosocial model: a model of health that integrates the effects of biological, behavioral, and  social factors on health and illness  Placebo effect: an improvement in health following treatment with a placebo – that is, with a drug or  treatment that has no apparent physiological effect on the health condition for which is was prescribed 11.2 Learning Objectives Define stress Describe the hypothalamic­pituitary­adrenal axis Discuss sex differences in responses to stressors Describe the general adaption syndrome Discuss the association between personality traits and health Distinguish between emotion­focused coping and problem­focused coping Define hardiness  How Do We Cope with Stress? Stress has physiological components Stressful events cause a cascade of physiological events ▯ release of hormones from the hypothalamus,  the pituitary gland, and the adrenal glands Stress­related hormones (e.g., cortisol, norepinephrine) circulate through the bloodstream, affecting organs  throughout the body Sex differences in how we respond to stressors Women and men respond somewhat differently to stress Women are more likely to tend and befriend Men are more likely to fight or flee Evolutionary psychology maintains that these distinct challenges faced by women and men in our ancestral  environment The hormone oxytocin may play a role in the tend­and­befriend response General adaption syndrome is a bodily response to stress Sely outlined the general adaption syndrome Consists of the steps by which the body responds to stress ▯ alarm, then resistance, and then exhaustion  (if the stressor continues) Stress affects health Excessive stress negatively affects health  Associated with the occurrence of a wide variety of diseases, including heart disease Individuals who are hostile or depressed are more likely to develop heart disease than those who are not Coping is a process We engage in cognitive appraisal of potential stressors  We may use emotion­focused and problem­focused coping strategies Problem­focused coping strategies tend to be more effective for controllable stressors and under conditions  of moderate stress Emotion­focused coping strategies tend to be more effective for uncontrollable stressors and under  conditions of high stress Individually who are hardy or more stress resilient Having a sense of autonomy and control reduces the experience of stress and increases well­being  Terms Stress: a pattern of behavioral, psychological, and physiological responses to events, when the events  match or exceed the organism’s ability to responds in a healthy way Stressor: an environmental event or stimulus that threatens an organism Coping response: any response an organism makes to avoid, escape from, or minimize an aversive  stimulus Hypothalamic­pituitary­adrenal (HPA) axis: the biological system responsible for the stress  response  Fight­or­flight response: the physiological preparedness of animals to deal with danger Tend­and­befriend response: females’ tendency to protect and care for their offspring and form  social alliances rather than flee or fight in response to threat Oxytocin:
More Less

Related notes for PSY-0001

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit