Textbook Notes (368,652)
United States (206,103)
Psychology (61)
PSY-0001 (33)
Chapter 13

chap 13 reading.docx

7 Pages
83 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSY-0001
Professor
Sam Sommers
Semester
Fall

Description
04/15/2014 13.1 Learning Objectives Describe the major approaches to the study of personality Identify theorists associated with the major approaches to the study of personality Define key terms associated with the major approaches to the study of personality How Have Psychologists Studied Personality? Psychodynamic theories emphasize unconscious and dynamic processes (Freud) Unconscious forces determine behavior Personality consists of three structures: the id, the superego, and the ego The ego mediates between the id and the superego, suing defense mechanisms to reduce anxiety due to  conflicts between the id and the superego We pass through five stages of psychosexual development which shape our personalities Neo­Freudians have focused on relationships, and in particular, children’s emotional attachments to their  parents  Humanistic approaches emphasize integrated personal experience Emphasis on experiences, beliefs, and inherent goodness We strive to realize our full potential  Roger’s person­centered approach suggests that unconditional positive regard in childhood enables people  to become fully functioning Personality reflects learning and cognition Through interaction with the environment, people learn patterns of responding that are guided by their  personal constructs, expectancies, and values Self­efficacy, the extent to which people believe they can achieve specific outcomes, is an important  determinant of behavior The cognitive­affective personality system (CAPS) emphasizes self­regulatory capacities Setting personal goals Evaluating progress Adjusting behavior accordingly  Trait approaches describe behavioral dispositions  Personality type theories focus more on description than on explanation Trait theorists assume that personality is a collection of traits or behavioral dispositions Eysenck’s model of personality Three biologically based higher­order personality traits: introversion/extraversion, emotional stability,  psychoticism Each of these traits encompasses a number of lower­order traits Five­factor theory  Five higher­order personality traits: openness to experience, conscientiousness, extraversion,  agreeableness, neuroticism  Terms Personality: the characteristic thoughts, emotional responses, and behaviors that are relatively stable in  an individual over time and across circumstances Personality trait: a characteristic; a dispositional tendency to act in a certain way over time and across  circumstances Psychodynamic theory: Freudian theory that unconscious forces determine behavior Id: in psychodynamic theory, the component of personality that is completely submerged in the  unconscious and operates according to the pleasure principle  Superego: in psychodynamic theory, the internalization of societal and parental standards of conduct Ego: in psychodynamic theory, the component of personality that tries to satisfy the wishes of the id while  being responsive to the dictates of the superego Defense mechanisms: unconscious mental strategies that the mind uses to protect itself from  distress Psychosexual stages: according to Freud, developmental stages that correspond to distinct libidinal  urges; progression through these stages profoundly affects personality  Humanistic approaches: approaches to studying personality that emphasize how people seek to  fulfill their potential through greater self­understanding Personality types: discrete categories of people based on personality characteristics Trait approach: an approach to studying personality that focuses on how individuals that focuses on  how individuals differ in personality dispositions Five­factor theory: the idea that personality can be described using five factors: openness to  experience, conscientiousness, extraversion, agreeableness, and neuroticism 13.2 Learning Objectives Distinguish between idiographic and nomothetic approaches to the study of personality Distinguish between projective and objective measures of personality  Discuss the accuracy of observers’ personality judgments Define Situationism and interactionism Distinguish between strong situations and weak situations Discuss cultural and sex differences in personality How Is Personality Assessed, and What Does It Predict about People? Personality refers to both unique and common characteristics Idiographic approaches are person­centered and focus on individual lives and each person’s unique  characteristics Nomothetic approaches assess individual variation in characteristics that are common among all people  Researchers use projective and objective methods to assess personality Projective measures assess unconscious processes by having people interpret ambiguous stimuli Objective measures are relatively direct measures of personality, typically involving the use of self­report  questionnaires or observer ratings  Observers show accuracy in trait judgments Close acquaintances may better predict a person’s behavior than the person can Acquaintances are particularly accurate when judging traits that are readily observable and meaningful People sometimes are inconsistent Mischel proposed the notion of Situationism, that situations are more important than traits in predicting  behavior  Behavior is influenced by the interaction of personality and situations Interactionism maintains that behavior is determined by both situations and our dispositions Strong situations mask differences in personality, whereas weak situations reveal differences in personality Most trait theories adopt an interactionist view  There are cultural and sex differences in personality Cro
More Less

Related notes for PSY-0001

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit