Chapter 9.docx

8 Pages
126 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Political Science
Course
POL 201
Professor
Sylvia Thompson
Semester
Fall

Description
Ch. 9 Political Parties 10/16/2012 Partisan­ a committed supporter of a political party, seeing issues from the point of view of a  single party The Role of Political Parties in a Democracy Not mentioned in the Constitution Political parties­ organizations that try to win control of government by electing people to office  who carry that party label In theory, political parties can do a number of things that make popular sovereignty and political  equality possible • Keep elected officials responsive; party platform­ a party’s statement of its positions on the  issues of the day • Stimulate political interest • Ensure accountability • Help people make sense of complexity in politics • Make government work The American Two­Party System Two­party system­ a political system in which two parties vie on relatively equal terms to win  national elections and in which each party governs at one time or another Multiparty system­ a political system in which three or more viable parties compete to lead the  government; because a majority winner is not always possible, multiparty systems often have  coalition governments where governing power is shared among two or more parties In the US, two parties have dominated the political scene since 1836 Minor or third parties have rarely polled a significant percentage of the popular vote in either  presidential or congressional elections although they are sometimes successful at state or local  levels Why  a Two­Party System? Electoral Rules The kinds of rules that organize elections help determine what kind of party system exists • Proportional representation­ the awarding of legislature seats to political parties to reflect the  proportion of the popular vote each party receives (most other countries have this) • Winner­take­all, plurality election, single­member districts­ each electoral district in the US  elects only one person to an office and does so on the basis of whoever wins the most votes;  votes for minor parties are wasted The Role of Minor Parties in the Two­Party System Minor parties have played a less important role in the US that in any other democratic nation Only the Republicans ever managed to replace one of the major parties Only six have been able to win even 10% of the popular vote in an election and only 7 have  managed to win a single state Minor parties come in several forms: • Protest parties sometimes arise as part of a social movement • Ideological parties are organized around coherent sets of ideas • Single­issue parties • Splinter parties form when a faction in one of the two major parties bold to run its own  candidate Sometimes they articulate new ideas that are eventually taken over by one or both major parties Also sometimes change outcome of presidential contests by outcome of electoral vote in some  states Shifts in the American Two­Party System Realignment­ the process by which one party supplants another as the dominant party in a  political system The New Deal Party Era New Deal­ the programs of the administration of President FDR Period of Democratic Dominance New Deal Coalition­ the informal electoral alliance of working­class ethnic groups, Catholics,  Jews, urban dwellers, racial minorities, and the South, that was the basis of the Democratic party  dominance The Dealignment Era Change in party system by three major developments 1. Strong support of the civil rights revolution by Democratic party caused white southerners  and blue­color workers to switch loyalty to republicans 2. Religious conservatives abandon democrats because of their support of feminists, fay people,  equal rights, and separation of church and state 3. Perceived Democratic opposition to the Vietnam War Republican capture of presidency (Nixon) and senate Divided government­ control of the executive and legislative branches by different political  parties With relatively conservative Democrats and liberal Republicans, a certain degree of  bipartisanship was possible Dealignment­ a gradual reduction in the dominance of one political party without another party  supplanting it The Parties at War Era Parties have been evenly divided and at war since Clinton and remain this way The Democratic and Republican Parties Today The Parties as Organizations Loose collections of local and state parties, campaign committees, candidates and officeholders,  and associated interest and advocacy groups that get together every four years to nominate a  presidential candidate Party Membership Being a member of a party may mean voting most of the time for the candidate of a party of  choosing to become a candidate of one of them It may mean voting in a party primary It may mean contributing money to, or otherwise helping in, a local, state, or national campaign  of one of the party candidates It may just mean generally preferring one party over another most of the time Par
More Less

Related notes for POL 201

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit