Textbook Notes (368,147)
United States (205,951)
Psychology (112)
PSY 625 (15)
Chapter

Ch 11.docx

11 Pages
36 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSY 625
Professor
Amy Weismann De Mamani
Semester
Spring

Description
Ch. 11 Attraction and Intimacy 11/14/2012 Need to belong: a motivation to bond with others in relationships that provide ongoing, positive  interactions Ostracism or the “silent treatment” is emotional abuse Love activates brain reward systems What Leads to Friendship and Attraction? Proximity Geographical nearness predicts whether two people are friends Proximity prompts liking Interaction “functional distance”­ how often people’s paths cross Interaction enables people to explore their similarities, to sense one another’s liking and to  perceive themselves a part of a social unit One factor is availability Anticipation of Interaction Anticipating to interact with someone breeds liking This is adaptive Anticipatory liking­ expecting that someone will be pleasant and compatible­ increases the  chance of forming a satisfying relationship Liking the people near us is conducive to better relationships, and to happier, more productive  living Mere Exposure Familiarity fosters fondness The tendency for novel stimuli to be liked more or rates more positively after the rater has been  repeatedly exposed to them Even exposure without awareness leads to liking Helped our ancestors categorize things as familiar and safe or unfamiliar and possibly dangerous Advertisers and politicians exploit this phenomenon when people do not have strong feelings  about the product or a candidate Physical Attractiveness Attractiveness and Dating A young woman’s physical attractiveness is a moderately good predictor of how frequently she  dates A young man’s attractiveness is a modestly good predictor of how frequently he dates Men put somewhat more value on the attractiveness of the opposite sex However, attractiveness of a man has strong influence on women’s desire to date that man The Matching Phenomenon The tendency for men and women to choose as partners those who are a “good match” in  attractiveness and other traits Happens with friends, dating, and marriage People seek out someone who seems desirable but they are mindful of their own desirability Less attractive person often has compensating qualities Each partner brings assets to the social marketplace, and the value of the respective assets creates  an equitable match Ex: the richer the man, the younger and more beautiful the woman The Physical­Attractiveness Stereotype The presumption that physically attractive people possess other socially desirable traits as well:  what is beautiful is good First Impressions • Attractiveness is most influential when meeting people quickly • Attractiveness and grooming affect first impressions on job interviews • The speed in which impressions form and their influence on thinking helps explain why  pretty prospers Is The “Beautiful is Good” Stereotype Accurate? • There is some truth in the stereotype: attractive children and young adults are somewhat  more relaxed, outgoing, and socially polished • More traditionally masculine or feminine • These small average differences are probably the result of self­fulfilling prophecies Who Is Attractive? Whatever the people of any given time and place find attractive To be really attractive, ironically, is to be perfectly average Facial symmetry is attractive Evolution and Attraction • Assume beauty signals biologically important information: health, youth, and fertility • Evolution predisposes women to favor male traits that signify an ability to provide and  protect resources Social Comparison • What’s attractive to you also depends on your comparison standards • It works the same way with our self­perceptions The Attractiveness of Those We Love • We perceive likeable people as attractive • When you grow to like people they seem to be more attractive Similarity Versus Complementarity Factors that influence whether acquaintance develops into friendship Do Birds of a Feather Flock Together? Friends, engaged couples, and spouses are far more likely than randomly paired people to share  common attitudes, beliefs, and values Likeness Begets Liking • People like not only those who think as they do but also those who act as they do (mimicry) • Similarity breeds content • Birds of a feather flock together Dissimilarity Breeds Dislike • False consensus bias; tend to see those we like being like us • Discovering that a person is actually dissimilar decreases liking • Dissimilar attitudes depress liking more than similar attitudes enhance it • People in relationships become more similar over time Do Opposites Attract? NO Complementarity­ the popularly supposed tendency, in a relationship between two people, for  each to complete what is missing in the other Liking Those Who Like Us Liking is usually mutual One person’s liking for another does predict the other’s liking in return Those told that others like or admire them usually feel a reciprocal affection A little uncertainty can also fuel desire We are sensitive to the slightest hint of criticism Negative information carries more weight because its less common and grabs attention Attribution If praise clearly violates what we know to be true, we wonder about ulterior motives We perceive criticism to be more sincere than praise Our reactions depend on our attributions Ingratiation­ the uses of strategies, such as flattery by which people seek to gain another’s favor If we attribute flattery to ingratiation­both the flatterer and the praise lose appeal Self­Esteem and Attraction In a time of low self­esteem and in need for social approval you are more likely to like someone  (rebound) Approval that comes after disapproval is powerfully rewarding Gaining Another’s Esteem Most likely to be interested in someone who does not favor you at first and then begins to Unpleasant ­> pleasant gives more of an impact We tend to filter our negative feedback Someone who really loves us will be honest with us but will also tend to see us through rose­ colored glasses Relationship Rewards Reward theory of attraction­ the theory that we like those whose behavior is rewarding to us or  whom we associate with rewarding events If a relationship gives us more rewards than costs, we will like it
More Less

Related notes for PSY 625

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit