Textbook Notes (367,753)
United States (205,876)
Psychology (112)
PSY 625 (15)
Chapter

Ch 10.docx

7 Pages
87 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSY 625
Professor
Amy Weismann De Mamani
Semester
Spring

Description
Ch. 10 Aggression 11/13/2012 What is Aggression? Physical or verbal behavior intended to hurt someone Hostile aggression­ aggression that springs form anger; its goal is to injure Instrumental aggression­ aggression that aims to injure, but only as a means to some other end What Are Some Theories of Aggression? Aggression as a Biological Phenomenon Instinct Theory and Evolutionary Psychology Freud speculated that human aggression springs from a self­destructive impulse Lorenz saw aggression as adaptive rather than destructive Both saw as an impulse Fails to account for the variations in aggression from person to person and culture to culture Aggression improved offs or survival and reproduction Status­based aggression Neural Influences Because aggression is a complex behavior, no one spot in the brain controls it but researchers  have found brain neural systems in both animals and humans that facilitate aggression • Amygdala • Gray matter • Abnormal brains contribute to abnormally aggressive behavior Genetic Influences Heredity influences the neural system’s sensitivity to aggressive cues Temperaments are partially hereditary Nature and nurture interact Genes predispose some children to aggressiveness Biochemical Influences Alcohol unleashes aggression when people are provoked Alcohol enhances aggressiveness by reducing people’s self­awareness, focusing their attention  on a provocation, and mental association of alcohol with aggression Human aggressiveness correlates with testosterone levels Deficits in important nutrients influences aggression Biology and behavior interact Aggression as a Response to Frustration Frustration­aggression theory: the theory that frustration triggers a readiness to aggress Frustration: the blocking of a goal­directed behavior Displacement­ the redirection of aggression to a target other than the source of frustration.  Generally, the new target is a safer or more socially acceptable target Outgroup targets are especially vulnerable to displaced aggression Berkowitz theorized that frustration produces anger, an emotional readiness to aggress Cues associated to aggression may provoke a frustrated/ angry person Relative deprivation­ the perception that one is less well off than others with whom one  compares oneself (frustration arises from the gap between expectations and attainments) Aggression as Learned Social Behavior Contend that learning pulls aggression out of us The Rewards of Aggression By experience and observing others, we learn that aggression often pays Observational Learning Social learning theory (theory that we learn social behavior by observing and imitating and by  being rewarded and punished) of aggression proposed by Albert Bandura Bobo doll experiment Physically aggressive children tend to have had physically punitive parents, who disciplined  them by modeling aggression The social environment outside the home also provides models • Readily transmitted to new generations • Broader culture matters too What Are Some Influences on Aggression? Aversive Incidents Pain Physical and psychological 
More Less

Related notes for PSY 625

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit