Textbook Notes (368,629)
United States (206,086)
Psychology (112)
PSY 625 (15)
Chapter 3

Chapter 3.docx

9 Pages
80 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSY 625
Professor
Amy Weismann De Mamani
Semester
Spring

Description
Chapter 3: Social Beliefs and Judgments 09/04/2012 How Do We Perceive Our Social Worlds? Our preconceptions guide how we perceive and interpret information Priming Unattended stimuli can subtly influence how we interpret and recall events Priming­ activating particular associations in memory Examples of everyday priming: • Watching a scary movie alone can cause us to interpret furnace noises as a possible intruder • Depresses moods prime negative associations (opposite also true) • Watching violence will prime people to interpret ambiguous actions or words as aggressive • Reading about psychological disorders primes how we interpret our own anxieties and  gloomy moods Priming effects surface even when the stimuli are presented subliminally Lesson: most of our social information processing is automatic (it is unintentional, out of sight,  and happens without our conscious awareness) Embodied cognition­ the mutual influence of bodily sensations on cognitive preferences and  social judgments (physical warmth accentuates social warmth and social exclusion literally feels  cold) Perceiving and Interpreting Events Despite some startling biases and logical flaws in how we perceive and understand one another,  we’re mostly accurate The better we know people, the more accurately we can read their minds and feelings BUT on  occasion, our prejudgments err Political Perceptions Because social perceptions are in the eye of the beholder, even a simple stimulus my strike two  people quite differently People everywhere perceive mediators and media as biased against their position People’s perceptions of bias can be used to assess their attitudes Our assumptions about the world can even make contradictory evidence seem supportive Presidential debates mostly reinforce predebate opinions Our Perceptions of Others “Kulechov effect” – film makers control people’s perceptions of emotion by manipulating the  setting in which they see a face Others’ Perceptions of Us When we say something good or bad about another, people spontaneously tend to associate that  trait with us (spontaneous trait transference) * We view our social worlds through the spectacles of our beliefs, attitudes, and values. That is  one reason our beliefs are so important ; they shape our interpretation of everything else Belief Perseverance Persistence of one’s initial conceptions, such as when the basis for one’s belief is discredited but  an explanation of why the belief might be true survives The more we examine our theories and explain how they might be true, the more closed we  become to information that challenges our beliefs Usually, we benefits from our preconceptions but we can become prisoners of our own thought  patterns Explaining why an opposite theory might be true reduces or eliminates belief perseverance  (ponder various possibilities) Constructing Memories of Ourselves and Our Worlds We construct memories afterward by using our current feelings and expectations to combine  information fragments We can revise our memories to suit our current knowledge Sometimes people construct false memories Misinformation effect­ incorporating “misinformation” into one’s memory of the event, after  witnessing an event and receiving misleading information about it Reconstructing Our Past Attitudes People whose attitudes have changed often insist that they have always felt how they feel now “Rosy retrospection”­ people recall mildly pleasant events more favorably than they experienced  them with any positive experience some pleasure resides in anticipation, some in the actual  experience, and some in rosy retrospection Revise recollections of people as our relationships change Current feelings guide our recall Reconstructing Our Past Behavior Memory construction allows us to revise our own histories Underreport bad behavior and overreport good behavior When we feel that we have improved, we may recall our past as more unlike present than it was How Do We Judge Our Social Worlds? Intuitive Judgments Advocated of “intuition management” think we should tune into our hunches Unconscious indeed controls much of our behavior The Powers of Intuition We know more than we think we do Controlled processing­ “explicit” thinking that is deliberate, reflective, and conscious Automatic processing­ “implicit” thinking that is effortless, habitual, and without awareness;  roughly corresponding to intuition • Schemas­ mental concepts or templates that intuitively guide our perceptions and  interpretations • Emotional reactions are often nearly instantaneous, happening before there is time for  deliberate thinking (neural shortcut) • Given sufficient expertise, people may intuitively know the answer to a  problem. Skills may  begin controlled and become automatic • Faced with a decision but lacking expertise, unconscious thinking may guide us to a  satisfying choice Some things – facts, names, and past experiences we remember explicitly and other things –  skills and conditioned dispositions we remember implicitly The Limits of Intuition Capacity for illusion – perceptual misinterpretation, fantasies, and constructed beliefs “illusory  intuition” Overconfidence As we interpret our experiences and construct memories, our automatic intuitions sometimes err Overconfidence phenomenon­ the tendency to be more confident than correct; to overestimate  the accuracy of one’s beliefs Confident people more likely to be overconfident in beliefs Applies to factual statements and social judgments Incompetence feeds overconfidence Confidence runs highest when the moment of truth in further off in the future • The “planning fallacy”­ overestimate how much we will be getting done and how much free  time we will have • Stockbroker overconfidence • Political overconfidence People recall mistaken judgments as times where they were almost right Confirmation bias­ a tendency to search for information that confirms one’s preconceptions Confirmation bias helps explain why our self –images are so remarkably stable (self­verification) Remedies for Overconfidence • Prompt feedback • Unpack a task
More Less

Related notes for PSY 625

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit