Textbook Notes (368,316)
United States (206,002)
Psychology (112)
PSY 625 (15)
Chapter 7

Chapter 7.docx

9 Pages
83 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSY 625
Professor
Amy Weismann De Mamani
Semester
Spring

Description
Ch. 7 Persuasion Persuasion­ the process by which a message induces change in beliefs, attitudes, or behaviors Persuasion is neither inherently good or bad It is a message’s purpose and content that elicit judgments of good or bad We call the good “education” which is more factually based and less coercive  than the bad  “propaganda” What Paths Lead to Persuasion ? People’s “Cognitive Responses” matter Pay attention to the message ­> comprehend it? ­> believe it? ­> remember it? ­> behave  accordingly? ­> action The Central Route Occurs when interested people focus on the arguments and respond with favorable thoughts Persuasion is likely if the arguments are strong and compelling Swiftly changed explicit attitudes The Peripheral Route Occurs when people are influenced by incidental cues, such as a speaker’s attractiveness Easily understood, familiar statements, are more persuasive Refers to decisions made without thinking Slowly builds implicit attitudes through repeated associations between an attitude object and an  emotion Different Paths for Different Purposes Central route processing can lead to more enduring change than peripheral route processing Often we take the peripheral route, by using simple rule­of­thumb heuristics What Are the Elements of Persuasion? Who Says? The Communicator Who is saying something does affect how an audience receives it Credibility Believability; a credible communicator is perceived as both an expert and trustworthy Sleeper effect­ a delayed impact of a message that occurs when an initially discounted message  becomes effective, such as we remember the message but forget the reason for discounting it Perceived Expertise­ support preexisting values and views, seen as knowledgeable, and speak  confidently Perceived Trustworthiness­ eye contact, audience believes that the communicator is not trying  to persuade them, those who argue against their own self­interest, those who talk fast Communicators gain credibility if they seem to be expert and trustworthy Attractiveness and Liking Having qualities that appeal to an audience. An appealing communicator (often someone similar  to the audience) is most persuasive on matters of subjective preference Liking may open us up to the communicator’s arguments (central route) or it may trigger positive  associations (peripheral route) • Physical attractiveness (especially for emotional arguments) • Similarity When the choice concerns matters of personal value, taste, or way of life, similar communicators  have the most influence On judgments of fact, confirmation of belief by a dissimilar person does boost confidence What is Said? The Message Content Reason vs. Emotion Well educated or analytical people are responsive to rational appeals (central route) Uninterested audiences more often travel the peripheral route; they are more affected by their  liking of the communicator When people’s initial attitudes are formed primarily through emotion, they are more persuaded  by emotional appeals When their initial attitudes are formed primarily through reason, they are more persuaded by  intellectual arguments Messages also become more persuasive through association with good feelings and enhancing  positive thinking Messages can also be effective by evoking negative emotions (a fear­arousing message can be  potent); the more threatened and vulnerable people feel, the more they respond; works best if  leads people to perceive a solution and feel capable of implementing it Vivid stories can be used for good when conveying a central message Discrepancy Disagreement produces discomfort, and discomfort prompts people to change their opinions On the other hand, people are more open to conclusions within their range of acceptability A credible source would elicit the most opinion change when advocating a greatly discrepant  position Deeply involved people tend to accept only a narrow range of views Build messages upon elements of their preexisting beliefs  One­Sided vs. Two­Sided Appeals Acknowledging the opposing arguments might confuse the audience and weaken the case BUT a message might seem fairer and be more disarming is it recognizes the opposition’s  arguments One­sided appeal works better with those who already agree Two­sided appeal works better with those who disagree Two­sided presentation is more persuasive and enduring if people are aware of opposing  arguments For optimists, positive persuasion works best For pessimists, negative persuasion is more effective Primacy vs. Recency Primacy effect­ other things being equal, information presented first usually has the most  influence (preconceptions control interpretations, a belief once formed is difficult to discredit) Recency effect­ information presented last sometimes has the most influence (better memory of  recent information; less common than primacy effect) Message #1 ­> Message #2 ……………………. Message #1 accepted Message #1 …………………… Message #2 ­> Message #2 accepted How Is It Said? The Channel of Communication The way the message is delivered – whether face­to­face, in writing, on film, or some other way Commonsense psychology places faith in the power of written words Active Experience O
More Less

Related notes for PSY 625

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit