Textbook Notes (368,318)
United States (205,993)
Chemistry (38)
CHM 2046 (15)
Christou (14)
Chapter 16

Chapter 16 Other Equilibria Week 2 2009.DOC

8 Pages
67 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Chemistry
Course
CHM 2046
Professor
Christou
Semester
Spring

Description
Section 16.6.  Slightly Soluble Ionic Salts + ­ Ionic salts are collections of cations (M ) and anions (X). When an ionic salt dissolves in  water, it does so by the ions separating as they become surrounded by H O molecules. A very  2 soluble ionic salt (e.g., NaCl) dissolves in water completely, giving Na (aq) and Cl(aq), and  ­ there is no solid left. However, some salts are only slightly soluble, and an equilibrium exists  between dissolved and undissolved (i.e. solid) compound.  Consider the addition of PbSO (s)  4 (lead sulfate) to water. PbSO  (4)  ⇌  Pb  (aq)  +  SO  (aq) 4­ At equilibrium, the rate at which more PbSO (s) dissolve4 (i.e. the forward reaction) is equal to  2+ 2­ the rate at which Pb (aq) and SO (aq) ions4come together to give PbSO (s) (the reverse  4 reaction). We say the solution is saturated i.e. the concs are as big as they can be.    If the reaction has not yet reached equilibrium, Q  is c 2 + 2 − [Pb ][SO 4 ] Q c=  [PbSO ] 4 The conc of a solid (= its density) is a constant  ∴ combine it with Q . c 2+ 2­ Q cPbSO ] =4Q  = [Psp][SO ] 4 Q  = “ion­product expression” or “solubility product expression” sp At equilibrium, Q  = Ksp     sp   ∴   K  sp[Pb ][SO ] 42­ ** K  =spsolubility product constant” or just "solubility product" ** K splike all other equilibrium constants, only changes with temperature. n+ z­ In general:         M X p q)  ⇌  p M  (aq)  +  q X  (aq) K sp [M ] [X ]P z­ q We usually only consider systems at equilibrium ∴ use K  (not Q ). sp sp Occasionally, we will consider Q  (see laspr) Examples: 2+ ­ 2+ ­ 2 Cu(OH)  (s2 ⇌ Cu  (aq) + 2 OH (aq) K  sp[Cu ][OH] CaCO  (3) ⇌ Ca  (aq) + CO  (aq) 32­ K  sp[Ca ][CO ] 32­ 2+ 3­ 2+ 3 3­ 2 Ca 3PO ) 4 2) ⇌ 3 Ca  (aq) + 2 PO  (aq) 4 K sp [Ca ] [PO ] 4  ** the greater is K , the mosp soluble is the substance ** ­8 e.g., PbSO K 4= 1sp x 10 insoluble CoCO K 3= 1sp x 10 ­10 more insoluble (or less soluble) ­15 Fe(OH) 2 K sp 4.1 x 10 most insoluble (or least soluble) Calculations Involving Solubility Products Two types: Use K  tspfind conc of dissolved ions Use concs to find K . sp ** Make sure the equations are balanced!! ** Example 1:  The solubility of Ag CO  is 0.022 M3at 20 °C.  What is K  of Ag CO ? sp 2 3 Answer: This is a common type of question ­ note that we are told the molar solubility of  Ag C2  (3.e. what concentration will dissolve, but remember it completely dissociate into ions).  Therefore,      Ag2CO  3s)  ⇌  2 Ag  (aq)  +  CO  (aq) 3­      [init]    (solid)      0      0 change   ­ 0.032 M +0.064 M +0.032 M [equil]    (solid)  0.064 M  0.032 M + 2 2 ­4 ∴   K  sp[Ag ] [CO ] = (3.064) (0.032)        ∴   K sp 1.3 x 10 ­3 Example 2:  The solubility of Zn (oxalate) is 7.9 x 10  M at 18 °C. What is its K ? sp Zn (ox)      ⇌      Zn  (aq)      +      ox  (aq) [init] (solid)    0     0 ­3 ­3 ­3 change ­7.9 x 10  M +7.9 x 10  M +7.9 x 10  M [equil] (solid) 7.9 x 10  M3 7.9 x 10  M3 2+ ­3 2  ­5 K sp [Zn ][ox] = (7.9 x 10 )        ∴      K  sp6.2 x 10 ­10 Example 3:  What is the molar solubility of SrCO ?  (K  = 5.4 3 10 ) sp This time we are given K  and spked to find the solubility. 2+ 2­ SrCO  3s)    ⇌    Sr  (aq)    +    CO  (a3)          [init] (solid)                   0 0 change ­x +x +x [equil] (solid) x x K  = x    ∴ x =  5.4  x  10 ­10          ∴ x = 2.3 x 10  M5 sp ­5 ∴ Solubility of SrCO  is 2.3 x 30  M ­6 Example 4:  What is the molar solubility of Ca(OH)  in water?  (K2 = 6.5 x 10 ). sp Ca(OH)  (2)    ⇌    Ca  (aq)    +    2 OH (aq) ­          [init] (solid) 0 0 change ­x +x +2x [equil] (solid) x 2x K  = 6.5 x 10  = x(2x)  = 4x     (careful !) sp ­2 ∴ Solubility of Ca(OH)  = 1.2 x 10 2M To obtain the  x  of a number, learn to use the  x y  button on your calculator  OR take the log,  divide by x, then antilog. Practice with the number 8 ­ its cube­root is 2. Section 16.8. Common­Ion Effect on Solubility The addition of a common ion (i.e. one involved in a K  reaction)specreases solubility — due to  Le Chatelier’s principle. PbCrO  (s) ⇌ Pb  (aq) + CrO  (aq) 2­ 4 4 2+ 2­ ­13 K sp [Pb ][CrO ] = 243 x 10 Imagine this PbCrO  system4at equilibrium. If we dissolve some Na CrO  (s) (very solubl2) in 4 this solution, what will happen? [CrO ] will increase, because the Na CrO  will dissociate to  4 2 4 give more CrO . 42­ 10% + 2­ Na C2O  (s4    → 2 Na  (aq) + CrO  (aq4 2+ 2­ 2­ 2+ The K  fsp PbCrO  tells4us that [Pb ][CrO ] is a const4nt ∴ if [CrO ] increases, [Pb ] m4st  decrease.   How can that happen?   Some PbCrO   (s) precipitates f4om solution,  i.e.,  the  equilibrium is shifted to the left. 2+ 2­ PbCrO  (s4  ⇌ Pb  (aq)   +   CrO  (aq) 4 2­                                                   Shift      4dd CrO The equilibrium will shift to the left (i.e., more PbCrO  (s) will form) until [Pb ] [CrO ] 2+ 2­ =  4 new 4 new  K sp 2.3 x 10 . ­13 2+ The same thing will happen if we add a soluble source of Pb  (e.g., Pb(NO ) ) that will  3 2 2+ increase [Pb ]. i.e. addition of Pb(NO )  to3 2solution of PbCrO  will cause4some more PbCrO  (s) to precipitate 4 from solution.
More Less

Related notes for CHM 2046

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit