Textbook Notes (368,116)
United States (205,941)
Economics (398)
ECON 103 (51)
Chapter 4&5

Microeconomics: Individual Choice in Communities Chapters 4 & 5
Premium

3 Pages
530 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Economics
Course
ECON 103
Professor
Alex Coram
Semester
Fall

Description
Chapter 4: Economics, Well­being and the Limits of Markets ­ We know money cannot buy happiness, but we assume that it can increase people’s happiness by allowing them to consume things that make them happier. ­ It is reasonable to assume that giving individuals more will make them happier. ­ Utility → refers to the amount of happiness enjoyed by a person. ­ Positional Goods → those where relative quantity matters most, where the link between context and evaluation is strongest. Non positional goods, by contrast, are those where our pleasure is independent of the behavior and possessions of others. ­ Nonreproducible → the supply of reproducible foods can be increased without diminishing their value. ­ The Baumol Effect → the tendency of services to rise in price relative to goods when an economy becomes more productive because productivity increases are concentrated in goods production. This is because labor services are valued not for their output but for the amount of labor that goes into them and, therefore, cannot ave productivity increases. **This leads to the cost­disease in the service sector where the cost of providing services rises relative to the price of goods. ­ Labor Productivity → the ratio of output to the labor input, either the number of workers or the worker’s time. ­ Economists who concern themselves exclusively with commodity transactions miss the great volume of activity allocated b command or through other types of exchange and as gifts, allocated by business decision, family, government, or by tradition. ­ Markets reward entrepreneurs who produce products that sell, markets encourage productivity and the development of products that consumers want. ­ Market exchanges are voluntary, economists assume that they are welfare enhancing for both parties and occur only because both parties to the transaction are made better off. ­ Markets also encourage producers to heed consumer demands, even the wishes of small, niche markets, because if they do not provide the right quality products at a food price then consumers may choose not to buy from them. ­ Markets can be democratic; and this protects members from discrimination. ­ Idiosyncratic → when a one party in a relationship needs special services for which the other party is a unique supplier. ­ Market Failure → describes a situation where the market outcome does not maximize welfare for society or even for the individuals involved. *A situation where a free market will not lead to an efficient allocation of resources. **Includes situations where the quantity producers supply at a given price does not equal the quantity consumers want; situations where prices do not reflect the true social costs of production because of externalities, public goods, or monopolistic practices by business. ­ Arthur Okun → Makes a utilitarian argument for redistribution, favoring redistribution from the rich to the poor on the grounds that the poor will value income more because they have less of it. ­ If a market is not perfect, then society can improve on the market allocation, creating a better and more productive economy. Chapter 5: The Evolution of Economic Ideas Philosophic Antecedents → ­ Thomas Hobbes → English philosopher (1588­1679) who wrote during the social disorders of the English Civil War of the 1640s. Warned that people were selfish egoists. In his masterwork, Leviathan (1651), he warned that outside of society, people are selfish egoists whose lives would be “solitary, poor, nasty, brutish, and short’, a ‘war of every man against every man.” When people formed society, they handed all authority over to a sovereign, a “Levithan”, exchanging obedience for protection. ­ John Locke → English philosopher (1632­1704) whose work was influenced by the much more tranquil “Glorious Revolution” of 1689 where Parliament peacefully replaced the English king. In Two Treatises of Civil Government (1690), he bases the right to private property on the labor people put into developing the property. Individuals form society, he argues to protect their rights and their property. ­ Voltaire → French philosopher (1694­1778) critical of France’s absolute monarchy and its alliance with the Roman Catholic Church. Leery of any absolute system, he a
More Less

Related notes for ECON 103

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit