PSY341H5 Lecture Notes - Lecture 7: Conduct Disorder, Antisocial Personality Disorder, Dsm-Iv Codes

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30 Oct 2018
School
Department
Course
Professor
The Dark Side of Human Psyche
Watch the Video Clip
Mass Murder – Anders Breivik’s case
Max and Moritz (Wilhelm Busch, 1865)
Fourth Trick: The Teacher
A Story of Seven Boyish Pranks
The teacher's pipe detonates
The End
Description of Conduct Problems
Age-inappropriate actions and attitudes that violate family expectations,
societal norms, and personal or property rights of others
These disruptive and rule-violating behaviors range from:
Annoying minor behaviors (e.g., temper tantrums) to serious antisocial
behaviors (e.g., vandalism, theft, and assault)
Description of Conduct Problems
• We must consider many types, pathways, causes, and outcomes of conduct
problems
• Are associated with unfortunate family and neighborhood circumstances
Social and Economic Costs
• Conduct problems are the most costly mental health problem in North America
• Early, persistent, and extreme antisocial behavior occurs in about 5% of children
Legal Perspectives
Juvenile delinquency
Legal definitions exclude antisocial behaviors of very
young children occurring in home or school
Minimum age of responsibility is 12 in most states
Only a subgroup of children meeting the legal definition of delinquency also
meet the definition of a mental disorder
Four Categories of Conduct Problems
DSM-5 Defining Features
Two DSM-5 disruptive behavior disorders
Oppositional defiant disorder (ODD)
Conduct disorder (CD)
Both have been found to predict future psychopathology and enduring
impairment in life functioning
CD stands out as the strongest predictor of adverse outcomes in adult
functioning
Oppositional Defiant Disorder
Age-inappropriate recurrent pattern of stubborn, hostile, disobedient, and
defiant behaviors
Usually appears by age 8
Severe ODD behaviors can have negative effects on parent-child interactions
Conduct Disorder
• Repetitive, persistent pattern of severe aggressive and antisocial acts
Conduct Disorder Age of Onset
Children with childhood-onset CD display at least one symptom before age 10
Children with adolescent-onset CD
Antisocial Personality Disorder (ADP) and Psychopathic Features
Pervasive pattern of disregard for and violation of the rights of others; involvement
in multiple illegal behaviors
A subgroup of children with CD are at risk for extreme antisocial and aggressive
acts and for poor long-term outcomes
Prevalence
ODD is more prevalent than CD during childhood; by adolescence,
prevalence is equal
Lifetime prevalence rates
12% for ODD (13% for males, 11% for females) 8% for CD (9% for males,
6% for females)
Prevalence for CD and ODD across cultures of Western countries is similar
Gender
Gender differences are evident by 2-3 years of age
During childhood, rates of conduct problems are about
2-4 times higher in boys
Boys have earlier age of onset and greater persistence
Early symptoms for boys are aggression and theft; early symptoms for girls are
sexual misbehaviors
General Progression
Earliest sign is difficult temperament in infancy
Hyperactivity and impulsivity during preschool and early school years
Oppositional & aggressive behaviors peak during preschool years
Diversification: new forms of antisocial behavior develop over time
Covert conduct problems begin during elementary school Problems become more
frequent during adolescence
Some children break from the traditional progression
Different Forms of Disruptive and Antisocial Behavior
Two Common Pathways
Life-course-persistent (LCP) path begins early and persists into adulthood (Moffitt,
1993)
Adolescent-limited (AL) path begins at puberty and ends in young adulthood
The Changing Prevalence of Participation in Antisocial Behavior Across the Lifespan
Adult Outcomes
50% of active offenders decrease by early 20s, and 85% decrease by late 20s
Negative adult outcomes are seen, especially for those on the LCP path
Causes
Early theories focused on a child’s aggression No single theory explains all forms
of antisocial
behavior
Today conduct problems are seen as resulting from:
The interplay among a predisposing child, family, community, and cultural factors
operating in a transactional fashion over time
Causes – Aggression and Bullying
Watch the video clip
Why do you think Daniel, who otherwise seemed like a good kid, bullied
Courtney?
Young people who are bullied often engage in bullying behavior themselves.
Why do you think this happens?
In every bullying situation, there is an imbalance of power. Explain how Daniel
had power over Courtney.
Think about how the bullying was resolved. How do you think that will affect
Courtney in the long run?
Hearing about his mother’s experience with bullying had a powerful effect on
Daniel. Why?
Courtney’s mom told her to ignore Daniel. What would you do if your child said
someone was constantly picking on him or her?
Professor Ken Dodge’s Research: Social information processing and aggression
Hostile interpretation style
Watch the video
Ambiguous situation
Our Research: Sympathy, Guilt, and Aggression
Aggression and Guilt Feelings
1. Judgment: Is this right or not all right? Why (not)?
2. Anticipated emotion to self as victimizer: How would you feel afterwards? Why?
The Happy Victimizer Task
Watch the Video Clips
Aggression and Guilt Feelings
Homework Assignment
• Write a brief article for a parenting magazine on how parents can influence their
children to be sympathetic and to prevent them from engaging in aggressive,
antisocial behaviour.
Give parents:
a) at least three pieces of advice on what they should do; b) at least three pieces of
advice on what they should not
do;
c) provide reasoning and supportive examples
Homework Assignment
Conduct a literature search to identify 3-5 papers that you will use to provide your
pieces of advice.
The article should include at least 3 recent empirical research papers from
developmental psychology research (and not more than 5 papers) to support your
pieces of advice on what parents should and should not do
For further information, read the detailed description on Quercus
This homework assignment constitutes 20% of your final grade.
Homework Assignment (Cont’d)
Deadline Date:
5:00pmonMonday,November12
Please drop off a hard copy of the article to the drop box compartment by
this deadline
The assignment drop box is located
around the corner from the P.U.M.P.
Room between DH2033 and DH2031
Effective Treatments for Children with Conduct Problems
Treatment Overview
Parent
Managemen
t Training
(PMT)
Teaches parents to change their child's behavior in the home and in
other settings using contingency management techniques. The focus
is on improving parent-child interactions and enhancing other
parenting skills (e.g., parent-child communication, monitoring, and
supervision).
Problem-
Solving Skills
Training
(PSST)
Identifies the child's cognitive deficiencies and distortions in social
situations and provides instruction, practice, and feedback to teach
new ways of handling social situations. The child learns to appraise
the situation, change his or her attributions about other children's
motivations, be more sensitive to how other children feel, and
generate alternative and more appropriate solutions.
Multisystem
ic Therapy
(MST)
An intensive approach that draws on other techniques such as PMT,
PSST, and marital therapy, as well as specialized interventions such
as special education, and referral to substance abuse treatment pro-
grams or legal services.
Parent Management Training (PMT)
Teaches parents to change the child’s behavior in the home and in other settings
using contingency management techniques
Makes numerous demands on parents
Treatment of the Defiant Child
The Kazdin Method Watch the Video Clip
Problem-Solving Skills Training (PSST)
Focuses on social-cognitive deficiencies and distortions in interpersonal situations
Five problem-solving steps
Children learn to:
Appraise the situation
Identify self-statements and reactions
Alter their attributions about others’ motivations
Preventive Interventions
Main assumptions
Conduct problems can be treated more easily and
effectively in younger children than older ones
Counteracting risk factors/strengthening protective factors at young age
limits/prevents escalation of problem behaviors
Incredible Years intensive multifaceted early-intervention program for
parents and teachers
Fast Track program to prevent development of antisocial behavior in high-
risk children, using five components
Counseling Approaches
What works?
A Developmentally Tailored Treatment Approach: Taking Development Seriously
Anger Management Training
Watch the Video Clips
Activity: Perspective-Taking Skills
Ethical Dilemma
Two young men, brothers, had got into serious trouble. They were secretly
leaving town in a hurry and needed money. Karl, the older one, broke into a
store and stole a thousand dollars. Bob, the younger one, went to a retired old
man who was known to help people in town. He told the man that he was very
sick and that he needed a thousand dollars to pay for an operation. Bob asked
the old man to lend him the money and promised that he would pay him back
when he recovered. Really Bob wasn't sick at all, and he had no intention of
paying the man back. Although the old man didn't know Bob very well, he lent
him the money. So Bob and Karl skipped town, each with a thousand dollars.
Activity: Perspective-Taking Skills The Questions
1. Which is worse, stealing like Karl or cheating like Bob? Why?
2.What do you think is the worst thing about cheating the old man? Why is
that the worst thing?
3. In general, why should a promise be kept?
4. Is it important to keep a promise to someone you don't know well or will never see
again? Why or why not?
5. Why shouldn't someone steal from a store?
6. What is the value or importance of property rights?
7. Should people do everything they can to obey the law? Why or why not?
8. Was the old man being irresponsible by lending Bob the money? Why or why not?
Beyond Perspective Taking Skills
Watch the Video
Frances de Waal – On Empathy
Empathy, Perspective Taking Skills, and Aggression
Counseling: Good Will Hunting
Film from 1997 with Robin Williams and Matt Damon.
Who is Will?
What is his problem?
What are his strengths?
Counseling: Good Will Hunting
Please watch the counseling scenes between Matt Damon and Robin Williams.
Look especially at how the relationship develops and what it takes for Will to be
willing to say anything of meaning about himself.
How does he get him to confront his past?
Good Will Hunting: Scene 1
Why does Will not want to engage with a counselor?
What brings about a change in his willingness to engage?
What can be learned from these scenes that is applicable to your work?
Good Will Hunting: Scene 2
• What are reasons for Will behavior?
Activity
Please divide into groups of 3
Come up with 5 things that help Will “tell his story” and engage in the
relationship with the counselor.
Then discuss the strategies that do not seem to work between Will and his
counselor.
Week 7: Conduct Disorder
Monday, October 29, 2018
3:31 PM
Unlock document

This preview shows pages 1-3 of the document.
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The Dark Side of Human Psyche
Watch the Video Clip
Mass Murder – Anders Breivik’s case
Max and Moritz (Wilhelm Busch, 1865)
Fourth Trick: The Teacher
A Story of Seven Boyish Pranks
The teacher's pipe detonates
The End
Description of Conduct Problems
Age-inappropriate actions and attitudes that violate family expectations,
societal norms, and personal or property rights of others
These disruptive and rule-violating behaviors range from:
Annoying minor behaviors (e.g., temper tantrums) to serious antisocial
behaviors (e.g., vandalism, theft, and assault)
Description of Conduct Problems
• We must consider many types, pathways, causes, and outcomes of conduct
problems
• Are associated with unfortunate family and neighborhood circumstances
Frequencies for Common Antisocial Behavior
Social and Economic Costs
• Conduct problems are the most costly mental health problem in North America
• Early, persistent, and extreme antisocial behavior occurs in about 5% of children
Legal Perspectives
Juvenile delinquency
Legal definitions exclude antisocial behaviors of very
young children occurring in home or school
Minimum age of responsibility is 12 in most states
Only a subgroup of children meeting the legal definition of delinquency also
meet the definition of a mental disorder
Four Categories of Conduct Problems
DSM-5 Defining Features
Two DSM-5 disruptive behavior disorders
Oppositional defiant disorder (ODD)
Conduct disorder (CD)
Both have been found to predict future psychopathology and enduring
impairment in life functioning
CD stands out as the strongest predictor of adverse outcomes in adult
functioning
Oppositional Defiant Disorder
Age-inappropriate recurrent pattern of stubborn, hostile, disobedient, and
defiant behaviors
Usually appears by age 8
Severe ODD behaviors can have negative effects on parent-child interactions
Conduct Disorder
• Repetitive, persistent pattern of severe aggressive and antisocial acts
Conduct Disorder Age of Onset
Children with childhood-onset CD display at least one symptom before age 10
Children with adolescent-onset CD
Antisocial Personality Disorder (ADP) and Psychopathic Features
Pervasive pattern of disregard for and violation of the rights of others; involvement
in multiple illegal behaviors
A subgroup of children with CD are at risk for extreme antisocial and aggressive
acts and for poor long-term outcomes
Prevalence
ODD is more prevalent than CD during childhood; by adolescence,
prevalence is equal
Lifetime prevalence rates
12% for ODD (13% for males, 11% for females) 8% for CD (9% for males,
6% for females)
Prevalence for CD and ODD across cultures of Western countries is similar
Gender
Gender differences are evident by 2-3 years of age
During childhood, rates of conduct problems are about
2-4 times higher in boys
Boys have earlier age of onset and greater persistence
Early symptoms for boys are aggression and theft; early symptoms for girls are
sexual misbehaviors
General Progression
Earliest sign is difficult temperament in infancy
Hyperactivity and impulsivity during preschool and early school years
Oppositional & aggressive behaviors peak during preschool years
Diversification: new forms of antisocial behavior develop over time
Covert conduct problems begin during elementary school Problems become more
frequent during adolescence
Some children break from the traditional progression
Different Forms of Disruptive and Antisocial Behavior
Two Common Pathways
Life-course-persistent (LCP) path begins early and persists into adulthood (Moffitt,
1993)
Adolescent-limited (AL) path begins at puberty and ends in young adulthood
The Changing Prevalence of Participation in Antisocial Behavior Across the Lifespan
Adult Outcomes
50% of active offenders decrease by early 20s, and 85% decrease by late 20s
Negative adult outcomes are seen, especially for those on the LCP path
Causes
Early theories focused on a child’s aggression No single theory explains all forms
of antisocial
behavior
Today conduct problems are seen as resulting from:
The interplay among a predisposing child, family, community, and cultural factors
operating in a transactional fashion over time
Causes – Aggression and Bullying
Watch the video clip
Why do you think Daniel, who otherwise seemed like a good kid, bullied
Courtney?
Young people who are bullied often engage in bullying behavior themselves.
Why do you think this happens?
In every bullying situation, there is an imbalance of power. Explain how Daniel
had power over Courtney.
Think about how the bullying was resolved. How do you think that will affect
Courtney in the long run?
Hearing about his mother’s experience with bullying had a powerful effect on
Daniel. Why?
Courtney’s mom told her to ignore Daniel. What would you do if your child said
someone was constantly picking on him or her?
Professor Ken Dodge’s Research: Social information processing and aggression
Hostile interpretation style
Watch the video
Ambiguous situation
Our Research: Sympathy, Guilt, and Aggression
Aggression and Guilt Feelings
1. Judgment: Is this right or not all right? Why (not)?
2. Anticipated emotion to self as victimizer: How would you feel afterwards? Why?
The Happy Victimizer Task
Watch the Video Clips
Aggression and Guilt Feelings
Homework Assignment
• Write a brief article for a parenting magazine on how parents can influence their
children to be sympathetic and to prevent them from engaging in aggressive,
antisocial behaviour.
Give parents:
a) at least three pieces of advice on what they should do; b) at least three pieces of
advice on what they should not
do;
c) provide reasoning and supportive examples
Homework Assignment
Conduct a literature search to identify 3-5 papers that you will use to provide your
pieces of advice.
The article should include at least 3 recent empirical research papers from
developmental psychology research (and not more than 5 papers) to support your
pieces of advice on what parents should and should not do
For further information, read the detailed description on Quercus
This homework assignment constitutes 20% of your final grade.
Homework Assignment (Cont’d)
Deadline Date:
5:00pmonMonday,November12
Please drop off a hard copy of the article to the drop box compartment by
this deadline
The assignment drop box is located
around the corner from the P.U.M.P.
Room between DH2033 and DH2031
Effective Treatments for Children with Conduct Problems
Treatment Overview
Parent
Managemen
t Training
(PMT)
Teaches parents to change their child's behavior in the home and in
other settings using contingency management techniques. The focus
is on improving parent-child interactions and enhancing other
parenting skills (e.g., parent-child communication, monitoring, and
supervision).
Problem-
Solving Skills
Training
(PSST)
Identifies the child's cognitive deficiencies and distortions in social
situations and provides instruction, practice, and feedback to teach
new ways of handling social situations. The child learns to appraise
the situation, change his or her attributions about other children's
motivations, be more sensitive to how other children feel, and
generate alternative and more appropriate solutions.
Multisystem
ic Therapy
(MST)
An intensive approach that draws on other techniques such as PMT,
PSST, and marital therapy, as well as specialized interventions such
as special education, and referral to substance abuse treatment pro-
grams or legal services.
Parent Management Training (PMT)
Teaches parents to change the child’s behavior in the home and in other settings
using contingency management techniques
Makes numerous demands on parents
Treatment of the Defiant Child
The Kazdin Method Watch the Video Clip
Problem-Solving Skills Training (PSST)
Focuses on social-cognitive deficiencies and distortions in interpersonal situations
Five problem-solving steps
Children learn to:
Appraise the situation
Identify self-statements and reactions
Alter their attributions about others’ motivations
Preventive Interventions
Main assumptions
Conduct problems can be treated more easily and
effectively in younger children than older ones
Counteracting risk factors/strengthening protective factors at young age
limits/prevents escalation of problem behaviors
Incredible Years intensive multifaceted early-intervention program for
parents and teachers
Fast Track program to prevent development of antisocial behavior in high-
risk children, using five components
Counseling Approaches
What works?
A Developmentally Tailored Treatment Approach: Taking Development Seriously
Anger Management Training
Watch the Video Clips
Activity: Perspective-Taking Skills
Ethical Dilemma
Two young men, brothers, had got into serious trouble. They were secretly
leaving town in a hurry and needed money. Karl, the older one, broke into a
store and stole a thousand dollars. Bob, the younger one, went to a retired old
man who was known to help people in town. He told the man that he was very
sick and that he needed a thousand dollars to pay for an operation. Bob asked
the old man to lend him the money and promised that he would pay him back
when he recovered. Really Bob wasn't sick at all, and he had no intention of
paying the man back. Although the old man didn't know Bob very well, he lent
him the money. So Bob and Karl skipped town, each with a thousand dollars.
Activity: Perspective-Taking Skills The Questions
1. Which is worse, stealing like Karl or cheating like Bob? Why?
2.What do you think is the worst thing about cheating the old man? Why is
that the worst thing?
3. In general, why should a promise be kept?
4. Is it important to keep a promise to someone you don't know well or will never see
again? Why or why not?
5. Why shouldn't someone steal from a store?
6. What is the value or importance of property rights?
7. Should people do everything they can to obey the law? Why or why not?
8. Was the old man being irresponsible by lending Bob the money? Why or why not?
Beyond Perspective Taking Skills
Watch the Video
Frances de Waal – On Empathy
Empathy, Perspective Taking Skills, and Aggression
Counseling: Good Will Hunting
Film from 1997 with Robin Williams and Matt Damon.
Who is Will?
What is his problem?
What are his strengths?
Counseling: Good Will Hunting
Please watch the counseling scenes between Matt Damon and Robin Williams.
Look especially at how the relationship develops and what it takes for Will to be
willing to say anything of meaning about himself.
How does he get him to confront his past?
Good Will Hunting: Scene 1
Why does Will not want to engage with a counselor?
What brings about a change in his willingness to engage?
What can be learned from these scenes that is applicable to your work?
Good Will Hunting: Scene 2
• What are reasons for Will behavior?
Activity
Please divide into groups of 3
Come up with 5 things that help Will “tell his story” and engage in the
relationship with the counselor.
Then discuss the strategies that do not seem to work between Will and his
counselor.
Week 7: Conduct Disorder
Monday, October 29, 2018 3:31 PM
Unlock document

This preview shows pages 1-3 of the document.
Unlock all 13 pages and 3 million more documents.

Already have an account? Log in
The Dark Side of Human Psyche
Watch the Video Clip
Mass Murder – Anders Breivik’s case
Max and Moritz (Wilhelm Busch, 1865)
Fourth Trick: The Teacher
A Story of Seven Boyish Pranks
The teacher's pipe detonates
The End
Description of Conduct Problems
Age-inappropriate actions and attitudes that violate family expectations,
societal norms, and personal or property rights of others
These disruptive and rule-violating behaviors range from:
Annoying minor behaviors (e.g., temper tantrums) to serious antisocial
behaviors (e.g., vandalism, theft, and assault)
Description of Conduct Problems
• We must consider many types, pathways, causes, and outcomes of conduct
problems
• Are associated with unfortunate family and neighborhood circumstances
Frequencies for Common Antisocial Behavior
Social and Economic Costs
• Conduct problems are the most costly mental health problem in North America
• Early, persistent, and extreme antisocial behavior occurs in about 5% of children
Legal Perspectives
Juvenile delinquency
Legal definitions exclude antisocial behaviors of very
young children occurring in home or school
Minimum age of responsibility is 12 in most states
Only a subgroup of children meeting the legal definition of delinquency also
meet the definition of a mental disorder
Four Categories of Conduct Problems
DSM-5 Defining Features
Two DSM-5 disruptive behavior disorders
Oppositional defiant disorder (ODD)
Conduct disorder (CD)
Both have been found to predict future psychopathology and enduring
impairment in life functioning
CD stands out as the strongest predictor of adverse outcomes in adult
functioning
Oppositional Defiant Disorder
Age-inappropriate recurrent pattern of stubborn, hostile, disobedient, and
defiant behaviors
Usually appears by age 8
Severe ODD behaviors can have negative effects on parent-child interactions
Conduct Disorder
• Repetitive, persistent pattern of severe aggressive and antisocial acts
Conduct Disorder Age of Onset
Children with childhood-onset CD display at least one symptom before age 10
Children with adolescent-onset CD
Antisocial Personality Disorder (ADP) and Psychopathic Features
Pervasive pattern of disregard for and violation of the rights of others; involvement
in multiple illegal behaviors
A subgroup of children with CD are at risk for extreme antisocial and aggressive
acts and for poor long-term outcomes
Prevalence
ODD is more prevalent than CD during childhood; by adolescence,
prevalence is equal
Lifetime prevalence rates
12% for ODD (13% for males, 11% for females) 8% for CD (9% for males,
6% for females)
Prevalence for CD and ODD across cultures of Western countries is similar
Gender
Gender differences are evident by 2-3 years of age
During childhood, rates of conduct problems are about
2-4 times higher in boys
Boys have earlier age of onset and greater persistence
Early symptoms for boys are aggression and theft; early symptoms for girls are
sexual misbehaviors
General Progression
Earliest sign is difficult temperament in infancy
Hyperactivity and impulsivity during preschool and early school years
Oppositional & aggressive behaviors peak during preschool years
Diversification: new forms of antisocial behavior develop over time
Covert conduct problems begin during elementary school Problems become more
frequent during adolescence
Some children break from the traditional progression
Different Forms of Disruptive and Antisocial Behavior
Two Common Pathways
Life-course-persistent (LCP) path begins early and persists into adulthood (Moffitt,
1993)
Adolescent-limited (AL) path begins at puberty and ends in young adulthood
The Changing Prevalence of Participation in Antisocial Behavior Across the Lifespan
Adult Outcomes
50% of active offenders decrease by early 20s, and 85% decrease by late 20s
Negative adult outcomes are seen, especially for those on the LCP path
Causes
Early theories focused on a child’s aggression No single theory explains all forms
of antisocial
behavior
Today conduct problems are seen as resulting from:
The interplay among a predisposing child, family, community, and cultural factors
operating in a transactional fashion over time
Causes – Aggression and Bullying
Watch the video clip
Why do you think Daniel, who otherwise seemed like a good kid, bullied
Courtney?
Young people who are bullied often engage in bullying behavior themselves.
Why do you think this happens?
In every bullying situation, there is an imbalance of power. Explain how Daniel
had power over Courtney.
Think about how the bullying was resolved. How do you think that will affect
Courtney in the long run?
Hearing about his mother’s experience with bullying had a powerful effect on
Daniel. Why?
Courtney’s mom told her to ignore Daniel. What would you do if your child said
someone was constantly picking on him or her?
Professor Ken Dodge’s Research: Social information processing and aggression
Hostile interpretation style
Watch the video
Ambiguous situation
Our Research: Sympathy, Guilt, and Aggression
Aggression and Guilt Feelings
1. Judgment: Is this right or not all right? Why (not)?
2. Anticipated emotion to self as victimizer: How would you feel afterwards? Why?
The Happy Victimizer Task
Watch the Video Clips
Aggression and Guilt Feelings
Homework Assignment
• Write a brief article for a parenting magazine on how parents can influence their
children to be sympathetic and to prevent them from engaging in aggressive,
antisocial behaviour.
Give parents:
a) at least three pieces of advice on what they should do; b) at least three pieces of
advice on what they should not
do;
c) provide reasoning and supportive examples
Homework Assignment
Conduct a literature search to identify 3-5 papers that you will use to provide your
pieces of advice.
The article should include at least 3 recent empirical research papers from
developmental psychology research (and not more than 5 papers) to support your
pieces of advice on what parents should and should not do
For further information, read the detailed description on Quercus
This homework assignment constitutes 20% of your final grade.
Homework Assignment (Cont’d)
Deadline Date:
5:00pmonMonday,November12
Please drop off a hard copy of the article to the drop box compartment by
this deadline
The assignment drop box is located
around the corner from the P.U.M.P.
Room between DH2033 and DH2031
Effective Treatments for Children with Conduct Problems
Treatment Overview
Parent
Managemen
t Training
(PMT)
Teaches parents to change their child's behavior in the home and in
other settings using contingency management techniques. The focus
is on improving parent-child interactions and enhancing other
parenting skills (e.g., parent-child communication, monitoring, and
supervision).
Problem-
Solving Skills
Training
(PSST)
Identifies the child's cognitive deficiencies and distortions in social
situations and provides instruction, practice, and feedback to teach
new ways of handling social situations. The child learns to appraise
the situation, change his or her attributions about other children's
motivations, be more sensitive to how other children feel, and
generate alternative and more appropriate solutions.
Multisystem
ic Therapy
(MST)
An intensive approach that draws on other techniques such as PMT,
PSST, and marital therapy, as well as specialized interventions such
as special education, and referral to substance abuse treatment pro-
grams or legal services.
Parent Management Training (PMT)
Teaches parents to change the child’s behavior in the home and in other settings
using contingency management techniques
Makes numerous demands on parents
Treatment of the Defiant Child
The Kazdin Method Watch the Video Clip
Problem-Solving Skills Training (PSST)
Focuses on social-cognitive deficiencies and distortions in interpersonal situations
Five problem-solving steps
Children learn to:
Appraise the situation
Identify self-statements and reactions
Alter their attributions about others’ motivations
Preventive Interventions
Main assumptions
Conduct problems can be treated more easily and
effectively in younger children than older ones
Counteracting risk factors/strengthening protective factors at young age
limits/prevents escalation of problem behaviors
Incredible Years intensive multifaceted early-intervention program for
parents and teachers
Fast Track program to prevent development of antisocial behavior in high-
risk children, using five components
Counseling Approaches
What works?
A Developmentally Tailored Treatment Approach: Taking Development Seriously
Anger Management Training
Watch the Video Clips
Activity: Perspective-Taking Skills
Ethical Dilemma
Two young men, brothers, had got into serious trouble. They were secretly
leaving town in a hurry and needed money. Karl, the older one, broke into a
store and stole a thousand dollars. Bob, the younger one, went to a retired old
man who was known to help people in town. He told the man that he was very
sick and that he needed a thousand dollars to pay for an operation. Bob asked
the old man to lend him the money and promised that he would pay him back
when he recovered. Really Bob wasn't sick at all, and he had no intention of
paying the man back. Although the old man didn't know Bob very well, he lent
him the money. So Bob and Karl skipped town, each with a thousand dollars.
Activity: Perspective-Taking Skills The Questions
1. Which is worse, stealing like Karl or cheating like Bob? Why?
2.What do you think is the worst thing about cheating the old man? Why is
that the worst thing?
3. In general, why should a promise be kept?
4. Is it important to keep a promise to someone you don't know well or will never see
again? Why or why not?
5. Why shouldn't someone steal from a store?
6. What is the value or importance of property rights?
7. Should people do everything they can to obey the law? Why or why not?
8. Was the old man being irresponsible by lending Bob the money? Why or why not?
Beyond Perspective Taking Skills
Watch the Video
Frances de Waal – On Empathy
Empathy, Perspective Taking Skills, and Aggression
Counseling: Good Will Hunting
Film from 1997 with Robin Williams and Matt Damon.
Who is Will?
What is his problem?
What are his strengths?
Counseling: Good Will Hunting
Please watch the counseling scenes between Matt Damon and Robin Williams.
Look especially at how the relationship develops and what it takes for Will to be
willing to say anything of meaning about himself.
How does he get him to confront his past?
Good Will Hunting: Scene 1
Why does Will not want to engage with a counselor?
What brings about a change in his willingness to engage?
What can be learned from these scenes that is applicable to your work?
Good Will Hunting: Scene 2
• What are reasons for Will behavior?
Activity
Please divide into groups of 3
Come up with 5 things that help Will “tell his story” and engage in the
relationship with the counselor.
Then discuss the strategies that do not seem to work between Will and his
counselor.
Week 7: Conduct Disorder
Monday, October 29, 2018 3:31 PM
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