Class Notes (998,923)
US (389,662)
CCSF (60)
ANAT 14 (40)
All (40)
Reference Guide

Permachart - Marketing Reference Guide: Splenius Cervicis Muscle, Latissimus Dorsi Muscle, Serratus Anterior Muscle

2 Pages
303 Views
Fall 2015

Department
ANAT - Anatomy
Course Code
ANAT 14
Professor
All
Chapter
Permachart

This preview shows half of the first page. Sign up to view the full 2 pages of the document.
TM
permacharts
Trigger Points I: Head & Torso
Trigger Points I: Head & Torso
Posterior View Sagittal View
Figure 1
1Serratus posterior superior
2Latissimus dorsi
3Multifidus (at L2)
4Multifidus (at S1)
5Scalene muscles
6Subclavius
7Serratus anterior
8Rectus abdominis (upper)
9Rectus abdominis (lower)
Figure 2
1Trapezius (#1)
2Trapezius (#2)
3Trapezius (#3)
4Trapezius (#4)
5Trapezius (#5)
6Trapezius (#6)
7Trapezius (#7)
8Splenius cervicis (upper)
9Splenius cervicis (lower)
Myofascial trigger points
are hyper-irritable areas
within muscle or fascia that
refer pain to other areas in
predictable patterns
Knowing the referred pain
patterns can be helpful,
as it can assist in locating the
origin of the pain and
relieving the pain by applying
pressure to the trigger point
• Healthy muscle tissue does
not contain trigger points
• Myofascial pain can be
caused by a variety of factors
such as stress, fatigue,
immobility or poor nutrition
• In addition to pain, trigger
points may cause dizziness,
sweating, vasoconstriction,
and muscle stiffness and
weaknes s • When left
untreated, a chain reaction
may occur, in which
secondary (or satellite) trigger
points develop in reference
areas of chronically active
trigger points and give rise to
more pain
• In these figures, the trigger
points are represented by
colored dots, with numbers
used to identify their names
• Each trigger point is
color-coded to match its own
area of symptom referral
• The pain referral areas may
have both light and dark
shades of the trigger point
color • The darker shade
represents the primary area
of symptom referral, while
the lighter shade represents
the secondary area of
symptom referral
Notes: A trigger point and its
corresponding pain pattern is
always found within the same
figure (in some cases, there
are two images per figure)
• Different figures may have
the same colors, but they
do not represent the same
trigger point
2
7
4
6
5
4
1
1
5
8
7
3
6
3
1
8
8
9
2
9
Figure 1:
Figure 2:
Posterior View Anterior View
2nd EDITION
© 1996 -2012 Mindsource Technologies Inc.
www.permacharts.com

Loved by over 2.2 million students

Over 90% improved by at least one letter grade.

Leah — University of Toronto

OneClass has been such a huge help in my studies at UofT especially since I am a transfer student. OneClass is the study buddy I never had before and definitely gives me the extra push to get from a B to an A!

Leah — University of Toronto
Saarim — University of Michigan

Balancing social life With academics can be difficult, that is why I'm so glad that OneClass is out there where I can find the top notes for all of my classes. Now I can be the all-star student I want to be.

Saarim — University of Michigan
Jenna — University of Wisconsin

As a college student living on a college budget, I love how easy it is to earn gift cards just by submitting my notes.

Jenna — University of Wisconsin
Anne — University of California

OneClass has allowed me to catch up with my most difficult course! #lifesaver

Anne — University of California
Description
p erm ac ha rts MT Trigger Points I: Head & Torso 2nd EDITION Figure 1 Figure 1: 1 Serratus posterior superior 2 Latissimus dorsi Posterior View Anterior View 3 Multifidus (at L2) 4 Multifidus (at S1) 5 Scalene muscles 6 Subclavius 7 Serratus anterior 8 Rectus abdominis (upper) 9 Rectus abdominis (lower) Figure 2 1 Trapezius (#1) 5 2 Trapezius (#2) 6 3 Trapezius (#3) 4 Trapezius (#4) 1 5 Trapezius (#5) 6 Trapezius (#6) 7 Trapezius (#7) 8 Splenius cervicis (upper) 9 Splenius cervicis (lower) 2 7 •Myofascial trigger points 8 are hyper-irritable areas within muscle or fascia that refer pain to other areas in 3 predictable patterns •Knowing the referred pain patterns can be helpful, as it can assist in locating the origin of the pain and 4 relieving the pain by applying pressure to the trigger point 9 • Healthy muscle tissue does not contain trigger points • Myofascial pain can be caused by a variety of factors such as stress, fatigue, immobility or poor nutrition • In addition to pain, trigger points may cause dizziness, sweating, vasoconstriction, and muscle stiffness and weakness • When left untreated, a chain reaction Figure 2: may occur, in which Posterior View Sagittal View secondary (or satellite) trigger points develop in reference areas of chronically active trigger points and give rise to more pain • In these figures, the trigger points are represented by colored dots, with numbers used to identify their names • Each trigger point is color-coded to match its own area of symptom referral • The pain referral areas may 8 have both light and dark shades of the trigger point 2 7 9
More Less
Unlock Document

Only half of the first page are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

Unlock Document
You're Reading a Preview

Unlock to view full version

Unlock Document

You've reached the limit of 4 previews this month

Create an account for unlimited previews.

Already have an account?

Log In


OR

Don't have an account?

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit