OEB 167 2-4.docx

4 Pages
63 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Organismic and Evolutionary Biology
Course
Organismic and Evolutionary Biology OEB 167
Professor
Jonathan Losos
Semester
Spring

Description
At least 27 species of crocodilians Crocodylia broken into 3 families Crocodylidae Crocodylus ­ 14 species and Osteolaemus – 3 species Crocodylus Pretty uniform group, but vary in size – dwarf caiman to Nile crocodile and saltwater crocodile  (reputed to be 10 m long – over 30 feet, but longest reliably measured were 7 m) Slender­snouted crocodile – narrow snout for fish eating, move jaws laterally quickly to snag fish.  Most crocodilians live in freshwater, but saltwater croc does venture into oceans, as far as 1000 km  from land in Pacific.  Crocodylus species not differentiated much genetically – found around the world in the tropics, very  similar genetically, suggesting that they have dispersed to current locations in relatively recent past,  suggesting they crossed oceans to do this Some described from Cretaceous period (65+ million years ago), so sometimes called “living  fossil,” but turns out that idea is mistaken – closer examination of fossils indicates not closely  related to present­day crocodylus, but does indicate that crocodylus­way­of­life has been around for  a while Where are these species coming from? Nile Croc (C. niloticus) – enormous geographic range, entire continent of Africa, including Sahara  in oases. (partially because Sahara used to be wetter). Also found on Madagascar. Reasonably  varied species, so some described different subspecies, etc, but considered one species.  Researcher at Fordham doing genetic study of variation in niloticus – one researcher was able to  swim in Chad with crocs, very docile – collected tissue samples, sequenced DNA, found big  surprise – animals from Chad highly differentiated – deep genetic subdivision into two clades –  separation dated back to 8 million years (using molecular clock). Two clades were different in their  chromosomes, and number of chromosomes. Suggested that they’re not reproductively compatible.  Also found that North American species fit into the Nile Croc clade – suggests that nile crocs  crossed ocean into N.A. and S.A.  She had few samples from north desert area, so went to temple of Sobek, extracted little bits of  tissue from crocodile mummies. Showed that two genotypes coexisted in the past – not only  genetically differentiated, but reproductively isolated because living side by side. Turns out, that  ancient Egyptians were aware that they were two species! Egyptian priests who collected crocs  intentionally got the one that was more docile, tamer, like the ones in Chad.  This species is called  Crocodylus suchus. West African Crocodile, or Sacred Crocodile.  Osteolaemus  Traditionally considered to be single genus with 1 species is actually 3 species  Highly differentiated, suggesting diverged for many millions of years These don’t occur together, so no assessment of whether they could interbreed. (Biological species  concept not applied like it was in Nile croc – whether or not they can interbreed). Phylogenetic species concept – they diverge greatly.  Slender­snouted croc – closely related to osteolaemus – formerly a member of Crocodylus, but that  would make Crocodylus paraphyletic and systemists don’t like paraphyletic groups, so renamed the  species from Crocodylus cataphractus to Mecistops cataphractus. Turns out this one is also broken  into 2 divergent clades – now 2 species of Mecistops. Mecistops occurs in much same place that  osteolaemus, and both species split around the same time. Suggests some common environmental  event affecting both species simultaneously. Called Vicariance. (Coordinated speciation in multiple  groups) Mecistops – 2 species! Alligatoridae Alligator – 2 species American alligator and Chinese alligator (A. sinensis – only about 2 m long, much smaller). Fossil  members of alligator found throughout Eurasia and northern California, Oregon, so used to be  widespread and it’s just gone extinct in most places.  American alligators is only species that lives in places where freezing temperatures occur – it  pokes nose through ice and keeps hole to breathe through. Can get frozen into ice and can survive  short term freezing temps. (We have seen some in Massachusetts – probably pets that got loose).  Reputed to get 6 m long, but best documented are 4 m long Caiman – 3 species Central and South America Most widespread is spectacled caiman – used to be common in pet trade Dwarf caimans – live in forests, most terrestrial of crocodilians.  Black caiman – largest caiman species Paleosuchus – 2 species Melanosuchus – 1 species Gavialidae Gavialis – 1 species Gavial/gharial – long thin snout with lots of teeth – India, 6.5 m long, probably most aquatic of all  crocodilians. Males have a large structure on nose called ghara, males make  whistling or buzzing  noise. Actual function of noises not well understood, but assumed something to be with sexual  selection, communicating either with other males or with females.  Tomistoma – slender snout with many teeth, but not as many as gavial. False Gharial – Tomistoma  schlegelii. Considered example of convergent evolution – similar morphologies, but originally  thought to be member of crocodylidae, but now molecular DNA sequencing shows that Tomistoma  and Gavialis are sister taxa.  Difference between alligator and crocodile? In general, crocodile has blunt, tapering snout, alligator  has broad snout, but this isn’t true! Some alligatorids (caimans) have narrow snouts, some crocs  have broad snouts. th One characteristic infallible: fourth tooth. In crocodiles, 4  tooth sticks out and is apparent. In  alligators, 4  tooth fits in notch in skull so can’t see it from outside.  Convergent evolution means that morphologies may be misleading when the molecular data does  no
More Less

Related notes for Organismic and Evolutionary Biology OEB 167

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit