Ch7.docx

12 Pages
117 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Sociology
Course
SOC 253
Professor
Brandt
Semester
Spring

Description
Chapter 7 A fundamental concept of criminal justice in the United States is the criminal justice system is an  adversarial system.  We achieve justice when a talented adversary (lawyer) is able to convince a judge or  jury that his or her perspective is the correct one. This chapter focuses on two issues central to the understanding this adversarial system.  First, the text  describes the roles and responsibilities of the “professional” members of the courtroom work group and the  “outsiders” to this group.  Second, the trial process is described in detail. What is the primary responsibility of the judge?  (To ensure that justice prevails) What is the responsibility of the prosecuting attorney?  (Represents the people) What is the responsibility of the defense attorney? (Represents the accused) The Adjudication Process The criminal trial is a complex event involving many participants. A lot of what goes into a trial happens  behind the scenes. Most of public perception of how trials work is influenced by the media. In reality, many such  representations are complete fiction. Adversarial System  The concept is a “battle” between the state and a legal “champion” of the accused. Jurisdiction One of the first decisions to be made when a person is arrested for a felony is which court has jurisdiction.  The general guidelines for determining jurisdiction have to do with which laws were violated and the  geographic location of the crime. If the violation is of both state and federal court, the defendant may be  tried in both. This is not a violation of the Fifth Amendment prohibiting double jeopardy since the violation of  both state and federal law are considered different offenses. Typically, however, most defendant are not  tried in both courts. Municiple or County Law­•Courts of Limited Jurisdiction – only deal with misdemeanor, petty offenses, and  traffic State­Limited Jurisdiction – if crime is a misdemeanor. Original Jurisdiction­ if crime is a felony Federal­Federal Magistrate – if crime is a misdemeanor. Federal District Court – if crime is a felony      Pretrial Proceedings Arrest, Initial Appearance, Arraignment Pretrial Motions Motion for Discovery ­ Disclosure A request by the defense counsel that the prosecutor turn over all relevant evidence,  including the list of witnesses, that the prosecution might use in the trial. Prosecutor may not withhold any evidence. Can be thrown out.  Suppression Court decides in advance Change of Venue When case gets a lot of media attention, my client cannot get a fair trial b/c we cannot get an impartial jury. Continuance I need more time. Cannot do within the speedy trial time allotted.  Dismissal Bill of Particulars Severance of Charges or Defendants If multiple defendants, motion to split trials into one per defendant  Bail Release of the defendant prior to trial. Bail exemplifies the American CJ assumption that defendants will be treated as if they are innocent until  they are proven guilty.  Bail has its root in English history. Magistrates used to place prisoners with private parties who would  guarantee that they would deliver the accused to court when it was time for trial. The parties were required  to sign a bon, called a private surety, stating that if they failed to deliver the prisoner they would forfeit a  specified sum of money. Today we use bail bonds agents Bail Bonds Agent An agent of a private commercial business that has contracted with the court to act as a guarantor of a  defendant’s return. Only the US and the Philippines use a commercial, for­profit business independent of the judicial system to  secure bail for a defendant. Explain how the system works. Bail jumpers and bounty hunters. Alternatives to Cash Bond Release on Recognizance (ROR) Release of the accused based on the defendants unsecured promise to appear at trial.  Unsecured bond Defendant signs a promissory note agreeing to pay the court if they fail to appear at trial. Signature Bond A promise to appear. Usually used in minor or traffic offenses. A promise to appear on a ticket, for example. Conditional Release  Defendant is released from custody of he agrees to court­ordered terms and restrictions, such as alcohol  treatment, anger management classes, etc.  Pros and Cons of Bail 50% released within 24 hours of arrest. 28% released one week after arrest. 10% incarcerated one month after their arrest. Competency to Stand Trial The concept that a defendant comprehends the charges against him or her and is able to assist his/her  attorney with the defense. A ruling of incompetency to stand trial is a temporary one. Once the defendant is well enough, the trial will  proceed. This differs from a plea of innocent by reason of insanity. Such a plea generally results in a number of  psychiatric examinations. Recall that insanity is determined by a jury, not a medical doctor in a criminal trial  Plea Bargain The negotiation between defendant and prosecutor for a plea of guilty for which in return the defendant will  receive some benefit such as reduction of charges or dismissal of some charges. Most offenses are settled by plea bargains, whereas a small percentage of defendants are convicted by  trial.  Pros and Cons of Plea Bargains: Time and Cost Savings Community Interest Clearing Cases Goes Against Our Desire for Just Desserts Too Lenient Preparation for Trial Court Docket The calendar on which court cases are scheduled for trial.  Statute of Limitations Legal Limits regarding the length of time between the discovery of a crime and the arrest of the defendant.  Roughly 18 months­Misdemeanor  No statute of limitations­ Murder, sex assault of minor.  6  Amendment and Speedy Trial In all criminal prosecutions, the accused shall enjoy the right to a speedy and public trial, by an impartial  jury of the State and district wherein the crime shall have been committed, which district shall have been  previously ascertained by law, and to be informed of the nature and cause of the accusation; to be  confronted with the witnesses against him; to have compulsory process for obtaining witnesses in his favor,  and to have the Assistance of Counsel for his defense Speedy Trial Act of 1974 Required a specific deadline between arrest and trial in federal courts. Barring delays created by the  defendant and except for a few well­defined situations, the court ruled that a defendant must be brought to  trial within 100 days of arrests or the charges could be dismissed. Speedy trial refers to the time between arrest and trial. Defendant can waive speedy trial. If attorney needs more time.  Courtroom Work Group Professional courtroom actors, including judges, prosecuting and defense lawyers, public defenders, and  those others who earn a living serving the court. Two groups: Professionals: paid to be there, court reporters, bailiffs, etc. Everyone else.  The Judge Elected or appointed to preside over a court of law Authorized to hear cases and conduct trials Role of the Judge Ensure justice. Ultimate authority on matters of  Law Evidence Decorum: may hold someone in contempt Usually when people think about the criminal trial the actor that com
More Less

Related notes for SOC 253

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit