Chapter 1 Communicating in a Changing Business World.docx

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Department
Business Administration - Accounting & Financial Planning
Course
Business Administration - Accounting & Financial Planning EAC349
Professor
marciagunter
Semester
Winter

Description
Chapter 1 Communicating in a Changing Business World  Better communication = earn more Communication theory: explain what happens when we communication Semantics: study of the way our behavior is influenced by words & others symbols used to communicate Communication Process Transmission Stimulus and Encoding through Decoding Interpreting Perception channels Feedback Choosing and Selecting  Feedback: direct and immediate or opposite; verbal or nonverbal – to clarify and confirm understanding  Noise can interfere anytime in that process; can be physical (static, hard to read writing), psychological (disliking speaker, being busy or decided)or socio-cultural (failure to follow etiquette or be formal)  Channels can be formal or informal o Oral channels – better for group decision making, clarifying misunderstanding quicker, and seem more personal o Shorter communication channels – more accurate than longer chains o Use 2 channels if very important message and cost of miscommunication high Types of Overload Channel Overload: too many messages going through at the same time Information Overload: students suffer from this but also happens in business environment. When you send something out to the receiver but the receiver cannot process the information – in business world  To deal with this: If can’t decode the message, it comes back to the sender who decodes it ASAP. 8 principles of semantics  Ensures messages are more effectively relayed, received and understood Perception involves the Perceiver as well as the Perceived - Perception is affected by the situation, prior knowledge, personal feelings etc. which people tend to attribute to others as well - Remember everyone’s perception will be biased even in the slightest - Different positions so view reality differently and draw different conclusions - If new idea different from your worldview, then maybe worldview needs to be rethinking Observations, Inferences and Judgments are not the same - Observation – what you yourself have verified - Inference – statement that you haven’t personally verified but whose truth or falsity can be established either now or in the future - Judgment/opinion – statement that can never be verified since can’t be measured objectively - Classify the statement as either of the three. - Estimate accuracy of inference by comparing to prior experiences - Distinguish between what you know to be the case or you assume/judge. Maybe italicize? No Two Things Are Exactly Alike - Don’t stereotype – people or objects Things Change Significantly with Time - Frozen evaluation – someone who doesn’t think prices, situations and people change - To avoid it: Provide frame of reference for comparison o Date statements o Periodically retest assumptions to ensure evaluation hasn’t changed Most Either-Or Classifications aren’t Legitimate - Polarization: trying to force the reader into a position by arguing that only 2 positions possible out of which one is unacceptable o Prevents common ground - Blindering: giving limited options; e.g. yes or no but no ‘I don’t know’ o Prevents seeing creative solutions - Don’t oversimplify ad think of a third alternative even when only 2 are given A Statement is Never the Whole Story - Meanings can be twisted if assume that statements contain all the info or when context omitted - Recognize reports don’t have all the facts and include inferences and observations - Include background info in your message for accurate interpretation Words Are Not Identical to the Objects They Represent - People, who name things and use words, provide the only connection b/t the thing & the word - People respond to the word or label instead of
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