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Chapter 1

ANTH 1006 Chapter Notes - Chapter 1: Linguistic Anthropology, Applied Anthropology


Department
Anthropology
Course Code
ANTH 1006
Professor
Kevin Mc Bride
Chapter
1

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Anthropology Book Notes
Anthropology: the study of humans around the world and through time
Comparative and holistic science
Holism: the study of the whole of the human condition
Anthropology:
examines all societies, ancient and modern, simple and complex, local and global.
Culture: are traditions and customs, transmitted through learning, that form and guide the
beliefs and behavior of the people exposed to them
Foraging: hunting and gathering of nature’s bounty
Food production: the cultivation of plants and domestication of animals
Biocultural: refers to using and combining both biological and cultural perspectives and
approaches to analyze and understand a particular issue or problem.
General anthropology: refers to using and combining both biological and cultural
perspectives and approaches to analyze and understand a particular issue or problem.
4 subfields: They are sociocultural, archaeological, biological, and linguistic
anthropology.
Cultural: focuses on societies of the present and recent past. (MOST Popular)
Archaeological: reconstructs lifeways of ancient and more recent societies
through analysis of material remains.
Biological: human biological variation through time and across geographic space.
Linguistic: examines language in its social and cultural contexts.
Cultural Anthropology:
the study of human society and culture, is the subfield that describes, analyzes,
interprets, and explains social and cultural similarities and differences.
Ethnography: provides an account of a particular group, community, society, or
culture.
Ethnology: examines, interprets, and analyzes the results of ethnography—the
data gathered in different societies.
Anthropological archaeology: reconstructs, describes, and interprets human behavior and
cultural patterns through material remains.
Applied anthropology: the application of anthropological data, perspectives, theory, and
methods to identify, assess, and solve contemporary social problems
Cultural resource management: involves not only preserving sites but also allowing their
destruction if they are not significant.
The management
part of the term refers to the evaluation and decision-making
process.
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