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Lecture 14

PSYC 2113 Lecture 14: PSYC 2113 Lecture Notes – March 5th
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2 Pages
65 Views
Winter 2018

Department
Psychology
Course Code
PSYC 2113
Professor
Birdie Bezanson
Lecture
14

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PSYC 2113 Lecture Notes March 5th
- Dissociative identity disorder used to be called multiple personality disorder
- People with this are very suggestible so some alters were being suggested by therapists.
There is a lot of controversy.
- A lot of people were being accused of child abuse due to repressed memories which
were shown to be false
- People ith dissoiatie idetity disorder do’t hae ultiple persoalities rather they
lack a central personality. DID is a fragmentation of personality
- Alters (different identities) will have some sort of similarity to host personality
- The switch from alter to host and vice versa can cause memory gaps.
- The host is’t eessarily the origial persoality, it’s the persoality seekig treatet
- Often people will have a ipulse alter, a proisuous alter (other alters do’t egage
in sexual behaviour)
- Alters can differ in age
- Socio-cognitive model: environment creates suggestions that come to be
- There can be some physiological differences in alters (such as eyesight)
- Different alters can have different dominant hands
- Unlike malingerers, people with DID will hide their symptoms
- One theory is that DID occurs due to avoidance of trauma
- A risk factor is low social support during trauma
- More apt to be diagnosed with when they have low support
- People with DID tend to have very rich imaginary worlds (not uncommon for them to
have had an imaginary friend when they were young)
- Average number of alters is 15
- More females have DID than men
- Onset is almost always in childhood
- Onset after 9 is very rare
- Tends to run a chronic course, difficult to treat
- High comorbidity with other disorders
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Description
PSYC 2113 Lecture Notes March 5 th - Dissociative identity disorder used to be called multiple personality disorder - People with this are very suggestible so some alters were being suggested by therapists. There is a lot of controversy. - A lot of people were being accused of child abuse due to repressed memories which were shown to be false - People with dissociative identity disorder dont have multiple personalities rather they lack a central personality. DID is a fragmentation of personality - Alters (different identities) will have some sort of similarity to host personality - The switch from alter to host and vice versa can cause memory gaps. - The host isnt necessarily the original personality, its the personality seeking treatment - Often people will have an impulse alter, a promiscuous alter (other alters dont engage in sexual behaviour) - Alters can differ in age - Socio-cognitive model: environment creates suggestions that come to be - There can be some physiological differences in alters (such as eyesight) - Different alters can have different dominant hands - Unlike malingerers, people with DID will hide their symptoms - One theory is that DID occurs due to avoidance of trauma - A risk factor is low social support during trauma - More apt to be diagnosed with when they have low support - People with DID tend to have very rich imaginary worlds (not uncommon for them to have had an imaginary friend when they were young) - Average number of alters is 15 - More females have DID than men - Onset is almost always in childhood - Onset after 9 is very rare - Tends to run a chronic course, difficult to treat - High comorbidity with other disorders - People who have DID often have histories of horrific abuse - Without treatment DID tends to stay stable but rate of switching decreases with age - Closely related to PTSD but even more tied to sexual/physical abuse - Treatment: tends to be long-term psychotherapy. There dont seem to be any medications for this - The focus of psychotherapy is on re-integrating all the identities. The success rate is only 25 percent - It is all about helping people understand that splitting isnt necessary anymore, help them get to know all their different alters - The re-integration will probably be attempted with an alter that can handle it - Another focus is on identifying and neutralizing cues/triggers that provoke memories of trauma and dissociation - The client has to be able to work through the original trauma - Depersonalization/derealisation: disruption in perception (detached) - Dissociative amnesia: disruption in memory (no brain injury) - DID: disruption in a cohesive identity - Malingere
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