Class Notes (835,662)
Canada (509,320)
Law (1,967)
LAWS 3602 (18)
Lecture

Lecture 05

5 Pages
74 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Law
Course
LAWS 3602
Professor
Patrick Murphy
Semester
Winter

Description
LAWS 3602 – Lecture 05: INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS LAW Country Report • United States ICCPR Report 2003 • Report actually made in 2006 • Human Rights Committee had a number of concerns Positive Concluding Observations • The Committee welcomes the Supreme Court’s decision in Hamdan v. Rumsfeld  (2006) establishing the applicability of common article 3 of the Geneva  Conventions of 12 August 1949,which reflects fundamental rights guaranteed by  the Covenant in any armed conflict. • The Committee welcomes the Supreme Court’s decision in Roper v. Simmons  (2005),which held that the Eighth and Fourteenth Amendments forbid imposition  of the death penalty on offenders who were under the age of 18 when their crimes  were committed. In this regard, the Committee reiterates the recommendation  made in its previous concluding observations, encouraging the State party to  withdraw its reservation to article 6 (5) of the Covenant. Subjects of Concern and Recommendations • The Committee expresses its concern about the potentially overbroad reach of the  definitions of terrorism under domestic law, in particular under 8 U.S.C. § 1182  (a) (3) (B) and Executive Order 13224 which seem to extend to conduct, e.g. in  the context of political dissent, which, although unlawful, should not be  understood as constituting terrorism (articles 17, 19 and21). • The State party should immediately cease its practice of secret detention and close  all secret detention facilities. It should also grant the International Committee of  the Red Cross prompt access to any person detained in connection with an armed  conflict. The State party should also ensure that detainees, regardless of their  place of detention, always benefit from the full protection of the law. • The State party should ensure that any revision of the Army Field Manual only  provides for interrogation techniques in conformity with the international  understanding of the scope of the prohibition contained in article 7 of the  Covenant; the State party should also ensure that the current interrogation  techniques or any revised techniques are binding on all agencies of the United  States Government and any others acting on its behalf; the State party should  ensure that there are effective means to follow suit against abuses committed by  agencies operating outside the military structure and that appropriate sanctions be  imposed on its personnel who used or approved the use of the now prohibited  techniques; the State party should ensure that the right to reparation of the victims  of such practices is respected; and it should inform the Committee of any  revisions of the interrogation techniques approved by the Army Field Manual. Response of the United States • On January 22, 2009, President Obama issued three Executive Orders relating to  U.S. detention and interrogation policies broadly and the Guantanamo Bay  LAWS 3602 – Lecture 05: INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS LAW detention facility specifically. One of those orders, Executive Order 13491,  Ensuring Lawful Interrogations, inter alia, directed the Central Intelligence  Agency (CIA) to close as expeditiously as possible any detention facilities it  operated, and not to operate any such detention facilities in the future (section 4  (a) of E.O. 13491). Consistent with the Executive Order, CIA does not operate  detention facilities.  • The Army Field Manual is consistent with Article 7 of the Covenant. As noted  above, in Executive Order 13491, the President ordered that, “[c]onsistent with  the requirements of . . . the Convention Against Torture, Common Article 3, and  other laws regulating the treatment and interrogation of individuals detained in  any armed conflict,” individuals detained in any armed conflict shall in all  circumstances be treated humanely and shall not be subjected to violence to life  and person (including murder of all kinds, mutilation, cruel treatment, and  torture), nor to outrages upon personal dignity (including humiliating and  degrading treatment), whenever such individuals are in the custody or under the  effective control of an officer, employee, or other agent of the U.S. Government  or detained within a facility owned, operated, or controlled by a department or  agency of the United States.” (section 3(a)). Individual Complaint • Kalonzo v. Canada ­ concerned a Congolese national residing in Canada, who  claimed that his return to the Democratic Republic of the Congo would constitute  a violation by Canada of article 3 of the Convention against Torture.  •  Moratorium declared by Canada on the removal of rejected asylum seekers to  that country  • The moratorium was put in place owing to the widespread violence in the  Democratic Republic of the Congo, but did not apply in his case on account of his  criminal past  • The Committee considered the State party’s argument that the complainant could  resettle in Kinshasa, and recalled that, in accordance with its jurisprudence, the  notion of “local danger” does not provide for measurable criteria and is not  sufficient to dissipate totally the personal danger of being tortured.  • The Committee concluded that that the State party’s decision to return the  complainant to the Democratic Republic of the Congo, if implemented, would  constitute a breach of article 3 of the Convention.  General Comment #2 • Committee Against Torture • Article 2, paragraph 1, obliges each State party to take actions that will reinforce  the prohibition against torture through legislative, administrative, judicial, or other  actions that must, in the end, be effective in preventing it. To ensure that measures  are in fact taken that are known to prevent or punish any acts of torture, the  Convention outlines in subsequent articles obligations for the State party to take  measures specified therein. LAWS 3602 – Lecture 05: INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS LAW • Article 2, paragraph 2, provides that the prohibition against torture is absolute and  nonderogable.It emphasizes that no exceptional circum
More Less

Related notes for LAWS 3602

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit