Class Notes (838,038)
Canada (510,626)
Philosophy (644)
PHIL 2380 (30)
Lecture

Cost-Benefit Analysis
Premium

4 Pages
128 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Philosophy
Course
PHIL 2380
Professor
Deirdre Kelly
Semester
Winter

Description
PHIL 2380 Mar 18 2014 Cost­Benefit Analysis 'Dirty' Industries: Just between you and me, shouldn't the World Bank be encouraging  MORE migration of the dirty industries to the LDCs [Least Developed Countries]? I can  think of three reasons: 1) The measurements of the costs of health impairing pollution depends on the foregone  earnings from increased morbidity and mortality. From this point of view a given amount  of health impairing pollution should be done in the country with the lowest cost, which  will be the country with the lowest wages. I think the economic logic behind dumping a  load of toxic waste in the lowest wage country is impeccable and we should face up to  that. The costs of pollution are likely to be non­linear as the initial increments of  pollution probably have very low cost. I've always thought that under­populated countries  in Africa are vastly UNDER polluted; their air quality is probably vastly inefficiently low  compared to Los Angeles or Mexico City. Only the lamentable facts that so much  pollution is generated by non­tradable industries (transport, electrical generation) and that  the unit transport costs of solid waste are so high prevent world welfare enhancing trade  in air pollution and waste. The demand for a clean environment for aesthetic and health  reasons is likely to have very high­income elasticity. The concern over an agent that  causes a one in a million change in the odds of prostrate [sic] cancer is obviously going to  be much higher in a country where people survive to get prostrate [sic] cancer than in a  country where under 5 mortality is 200 per thousand. Also, much of the concern over  industrial atmosphere discharge is about visibility impairing particulates. These  discharges may have very little direct health impact. Clearly trade in goods that embody  aesthetic pollution concerns could be welfare enhancing. While production is mobile the  consumption of pretty air is a non­tradable. The problem with the arguments against all of  these proposals for more pollution in LDCs (intrinsic rights to certain goods, moral  reasons, social concerns, lack of adequate markets, etc.) could be turned around and used  more or less effectively against every Bank proposal for liberalization. ­The Implied Ethic ­Economics is a science that policymakers use when making decisions ­In order to avoid the naturalistic fallacy, there must be assumed normative  system in place ­This is a form of utilitarianism, where policymakers are told we “ought” to make  choices that maximize the overall utility ­Economic Utilitarianism: an ethical theory that tells policymakers to measure net  benefits according to people’s willingness to pay for goods and services ­Pros ­When the market is working properly, then we are going to maximize  aggregate net benefits by working selfishly ­Cons ­Excludes all of those who are not party to the economic system ­Future generations ­Impoverished ­Non­human beings ­Does not account for market failure of pollution and the use of public  goods ­This is why we turn to cost­benefit analysis ­History of C­B A ­Dates back to 19  century France ­Post­WW2 concerned with the way in which public funds were invested ­Has since the 1960s been accepted as the major appraisal technique for  investments of public goods and public policy ­C­B A ­Cost: Reduction of human wellbeing ­Benefit: Increase in human wellbeing (utility) ­For a project to qualify on CBA, the benefits must outweigh the costs ­Usually the limits of CBA are the country or nation, but they can be extended  outward ­Rules of CBA ­Aggregating benefits across different social groups or nations involves summing  willingness to pay for benefits, or willingness to accept compensation for losses ­Higher weights can be given to benefits and costs accruing to disadvantaged or  low­income groups ­Stages of CBA ­List of projects ­Determining standing ­Which people have standing ­Time­preferences ­Risk and uncertainty ­Select and measure all costs and benefits ­Predic
More Less

Related notes for PHIL 2380

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit