Class Notes (834,966)
Canada (508,836)
PSCI 1100 (40)
Lecture

PSCI 1100B - Mar 6 2013.docx

3 Pages
169 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Political Science
Course
PSCI 1100
Professor
William Walters
Semester
Winter

Description
04/03  Jane Jacobs & the Power of Community  • Freedom­ in terms of how it’s practiced, set of practices (historical)  • 1940­1950  Planning for Freedom: • Beveridge Report­ sending the troops to fight  • (U,K,) 5 giant evils­ • (Canada) Report on Social Security  • (U.S.) Free Speech   • freedom in a negative sense ( constitutions and legal aspects­ citizens have the  rights) – negative rights, you will be free to the following rights  • positive sense of freedom – absence of restraint, offering people social rights  (freedoms have to be institutionalized)  • Social Security­ define the societies for the future  • Jane Jacobs (late 1950) – the death and life of great American cities (1961)  o Quality of freedom, reservations (conservatives and liberals)  o Hayerk:  neo­ liberal­ 1944­1945 (the Road to Serfum?: the opposite of  Jacobs’ book [minority]  o Jacobs : Critique of the welfare state, she is not appealing to the market,  vision of the good society­ communities, people in their day­to­day  interactions (subject that she seeks to mobilize­ activist)  o  Reacting to the failures (in her opinion) of large bureaucracies   o freedom­ living in dense, urban communities  o people have different ways of responding to the unfair treatment  o precise and empirical­ matter of layout of the streets, buildings are too  apart (Trust) – shape through urban design, architecture and people  o Ideas have mutated, but still are present in today’s life (positive references  to these ideas) – ‘community watch’ [official institutions take hold of her  ideas and turn them into their practice]  o Four rules for Successful Urban Planning o Robert Moses –redefying NY (1952­1958) Washington Square Park was  preserved  o Connection between politics and these ideas  What is High Modernism?  “..a strong (one might even say muscle­bound) version of the beliefs in scientific and  technical progress that were associated with industrialization in Western Europe and in  North America…. At its center was a supreme self­confidence about continued linear  progress, the development of scientific and technical knowledge, the expansion of  production, the rational design of social order, the growing satisfaction of human needs,  and, not least. an increasing control over nature (including human nature) commensurate  with scientific understanding of natural laws”. (1998: 89­90) • Strong, masculine visions of society  • Power
More Less

Related notes for PSCI 1100

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit