Class Notes (837,612)
Canada (510,370)
Psychology (2,710)
PSYC 2001 (163)
Lecture

Psych 2001- Lectures 1-3.docx

17 Pages
117 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSYC 2001
Professor
Guy Lacroix
Semester
Winter

Description
Lecture #1  01/28/2014 Authority: Someone tells us that a statement is true Reason: Using thought and logic to decide that something is true. Empiricism: Observing the world to decide that something is true Case of Clever Hans A form of involuntary and unconscious cuing. The term refers to a horse (Kluge Hans, referred to in the  literature as "Clever Hans") who responded to questions requiring mathematical calculations by tapping his  hoof. Pfungst launched an independent investigation of Hans ability with the help of M. von Osten.  Conclusion: Hans was indeed clever, but he did not have any “human­like” intellectual abilities. Skepticism:  ­When we say we are “skeptical,” we mean that we must see compelling evidence  before we believe. ­skepticism is a method, not a position. Connectivity Principle: (stanovich, 2010) ­New theories in science must make contact with previous established empirical fact.  ­New findings should usually fit established scientific theories.  ­For a new theory to be adopted, it must explain old, well­established findings, explain previously  unexplained findings, and point to as of yet unknown findings.  Bat and Ball problem: A bat and ball cost $1.10, the bat costs one dollar more than the ball.  How much does the ball cost? 1.05$ for the bat, 0.05$ for the ball. The cognitive miser: People tend to consider very little information when they need to take decisions;  they avoid thinking. Vividness problem (Stanovich, 2010) When faced with a problem­solving or decision­making decision situation, people retrieve from memory the  information that seems relevant to the situation at hand For scientists, testimonial evidence is useless, because: ­the sample of the “study” is 1 ­cause cannot be determined ­multiple alternative explanations are available Other common examples: diets, medical treatments, self­help, learning… Unfortunately, pseudoscientists and charlatans use testimonials profusely to deceive people. The confirmation bias is a pervasive cognitive phenomenon (Baron, 2008). ­People may continue to hold beliefs for which there is no empirical support (e.g., astrology) because they  only seek confirmatory evidence. ­The search for counter­evidence is a more powerful way of testing theories and ideas Knowledge Gaps ­Missing knowledge that may lead people to take suboptimal or inappropriate decisions (Stanovich, 2009).  ­Examples from the domain of probability: Insensitivity to sample size (base rate neglect) – Nurse vs. hockey player problem Insensitivity to prior probability of outcome – Hospital problem “Gambler’s fallacy” – coin toss problem The Forer effect and fortune telling Idea Properties If some ideas have been demonstrated to be false, why do they stick around? Key insight: “…a belief may spread without necessarily being true or helping the human  being who holds the belief in any way.” (Stanovich, 2009, p. 162). Properties of the ideas (see memetics, Blackmore, 1999): Interesting (e.g., ghost stories) Self­replicating properties (e.g., chain emails) Anti­evaluation properties   Personal Dispositions ­Thinking dispositions ­desire to believe things (life after death) ­need to assign a cause. What is science? Science is a method for acquiring knowledge that protects us against our propensity for flawed and  egocentric reasoning. Empirically Solvable Problems type of questions that scientists address are potentially answerable by means of currently available  empirical techniques. ­Theoretical constructs can be operationalized ­Theory tested is falsifiable (Popper, 1959) ­Mathematical and technological tools are available. Systematic Empiricism Structured observations that reveal something about the underlying nature of the world. ­Theory­driven ­Organized ­Empirical Replication and Peer Review  To be considered legitimate, research must be presented to the scientific community in a way that enables  researchers to: ­evaluate and criticize claims and theories ­to reproduce experiments ­to replicate results . Lecture #2 01/28/2014 How does Scientific research proceed? 1) Develop a question 2) Embed the question in theoretical context 3)Design experiment 4)conduct the experiment 5) Analyze data 6)Interpret data 7)communicate the results Develop a question Scientific research is a complex enterprise. It requires: ­Conceptual and methodological expertise in a highly specialized area of knowledge ­Access to the scientific community (written work and “live” contact) ­Funding (for technology and human resources) ­Time ­scientific research requires extensive training. Experts in Psychology: (it takes 10 years to become an expert in any field) Experimental psychologists (Ph. D.) Clinical psychologists (Ph. D or D. Psy) Psychiatrists (M.D.) Counselors (M.Ed.) Many other peripheral professions have some expertise in psychology. Lecture #2 01/28/2014 Experts get their research ideas: Sources are multiple (intuition, observation, specific problems), but mostly, researchers pursue a program  of research. They: develop and refine methodological techniques, gather empirical data, evaluate theories. Embed the question… Theory: It is a set of logically organized constructs that serve to explain and predict empirical phenomena. Construct: A scientific concept that is meaningful because it is part of a theoretical network. Operationalization (of theoretical constructs): To establish a clear relationship between the theoretical  construct and its empirical basis in the operations producing the data. Hypotheses: In science, questions are answered by posing hypotheses. Hypothesis. A provisional explanatory proposition which makes certain definite predictions concerning  empirical data Ex: if theory X is correct, then I should observe Y in the world. Inferential reasoning: An inference that draws a conclusion about a specific event on the basis of a general concept.  Conclusion follows if the structure of the argument is sound and premises are true.  An inference that builds a general explanation about a phenomenon based on a subset of observations. The strength of the induction is proportional to that of the evidence. Design the experiment Lecture #2 01/28/2014 There are multiple research designs. Selection depends on the state of knowledge. ­Descriptive research and case studies ­Correlational research ­Nonexperimental and quasi­experimental designs ­Experimental research Conduct the experiment  Once the study is designed, the research conducts the experiment. ­Obtains permission from Ethics Review Board ­Selects and recruits participants ­Collects the data Analyze the data  Descriptive statistics: Methods of characterizing or summarizing a given set of data. ­Averages: mean, median, mode ­Dispersion: range, variance, standard deviation ­Tables, Graphs, and Figures Inferential statistics: The aspect of statistics that deals with methods for making appropriate inferences about populations on the  basis of samples. ­Safeguard against making theoretical arguments based on a “lucky” result. For all inferential statistics, the p­value indicaprobability  that the result was obtained by chance. Lecture #2 01/28/2014 Interpret the data Once the data have been analyzed, the researcher determines what they mean. If the hypothesis is supported: What do the results mean for theory? How can the results be extended? How can the results be applied? If the hypothesis is not supported: Was the methodology wrong? Was the theory wrong? Communication When the research has been conducted, psychologists communicate their data and their interpretations to  the scientific community. The main vehicles vary depending on the scientific discipline, but in psychology, they are: Posters, Talks, Books, Peer Reviewed Journal articles.  Talks: Scientific conferences in all areas of science are organized regularly. Scientist
More Less

Related notes for PSYC 2001

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit