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HIST 3200 (12)
Lecture

jan 13 2014.docx

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Department
History
Course
HIST 3200
Professor
Katie Mc Cullough
Semester
Winter

Description
Jan 13 2014 1. Fabian Socialists a. Critical of the free market b. Thought workers would uprise if they weren’t given charity c. Preferred economic planning d. Proponents of working class self help e. Also engaged in case work f. Motivations were slightly different, towards a socialist end rather than laissez-faire 2. Middle class morality (victorian virtues) a. Self-help b. Hard-work/self-sufficiency c. Domesticity d. Thrift e. Sobriety f. Cleanliness g. Punctuality 3. The family a. The first resort in times of need b. Working class respectability c. The working class was more interested in keep up appearances to their neighbours than integrating middle class morality into their lives d. People looked to family first and foremost e. Charity is last resort f. Relying on neighbors 4. Friendly or fraternal societies a. Mutual assistance b. Pride in belonging c. Community development i. Becomes self help for everyone d. All members pay a weekly contribution, and people get helped out during hard times and at the end of the year the left overs are used to benefit all e. 6 million members by 1904 i. 1.3 trade unionists (protect industrial workers) f. friend groups g. people who joined these communities were better off than those who didn’t 5. yearly societies a. families pool their earnings together and invest them---social safety net in the absesnse of the state b. today known as credit unions or building societies c. affordable morgages d. provided loans for the cost of a families rent in times of desperation 6. savings banks and penny banks a. banks were for wealthy people, they wouldn’t take money from working class b. penny banks were for the working class [Type text] [Type text] [Type text] 7. cooperatives a. very poor were exempt due to the cost of membership b. provided cheap goods and dividends for those who joined c. no grocery stores til the 70s d. you have to pay to join e. investment in the community f. women open cooperative guilds—getting more active politically by getting poor law reform, public health and education reform 8. funeral insurance a. nobody wanted a paupers funeral b. high priority for families 9. pawn shops a. used in times of desperation b. corner shops would often give credit to those in need c. might give credit to people in need d. you would pawn your suit on Monday, spend the week saving money to buy it again, and repeat the cycle i. super important to show up Sunday in your nicest clothes 10. working class a. generally agreed by historians that the middle classes had this assumption that the working classes had middle class aspirations by adopting self-help programs like listed above—this was not true, this was just how the working classes got by on their own; they had their own sort of inter-class hierarchy and wanted to better themselves in their own class and not become middle class b. differentiated themselves from those who were full employed and those who were not—those who were skilled workers and those who weren’t c. most working class were living in extreme poverty; fluctuating during the lives of the individual d. could move up and down the social ladder e. taking the train into work was a sign of prosperity f. how did working class respectability differ from middle class respectability? i. Based on a series of social, economic support, negotiated within their own class ii. Drinking iii. Respectability meant different things to different people iv. Require victorian virtues—like thrift v. Careful budgeting was crucial vi. Not necessarily meant savings account, church attendance vii. Looking your best---possessing a Sunday suit and being able to wear it viii. Children having shoes ix. Employed victorian virtues in a way that was unique to working class Jan 13 2014 x. Death, unemployement, illness, weather, age, seas
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