Class Notes (837,838)
Canada (510,504)
Music (230)
MUSC 2150 (157)
Lecture

MUSIC WRITTEN 1.doc

101 Pages
481 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Music
Course
MUSC 2150
Professor
Shannon Carter
Semester
Fall

Description
­A record can chart well  have little influence, or moderately well (or even poorly) have a  lot of influence. ­ broad sense, still best instruments available to judge listeners’ changing tastes, even if  measurements are  flawed. ­Ideally access to comprehensive radio playlists of various eras, or actual number of records sold of any song or  album.  ­ playlist data not plentiful , record companies often manipulate sales numbers (frequent  complaint of  artists ­ Record Industry Association of America (RIAA) awards gold records = sales of 500,000 units  and  platinum records = one million units,  helpful  measuring success of album or single.  ­RIAA website (www.riaa.com) allows you to look up any hit record and track its award  history.  ­Google Books provides access to  extensive collection of Billboard magazines, allowing  us to consider aspects of advertising and industry news at  particular date. The Four Themes ­following chapters  take a three­ to ten­year period of history , organize music along stylistic lines.  ­Some chapters cover  same years from different angles. ­ For example,  mid­1960s  covered in three chapters: Ch 4, devoted to the British  invasion; Ch5,  discusses American response to it; Ch 6, focuses on black pop. ­Each chapter  raises set of interpretive issues providing insight into scholarly + critical debates  ­­    ­four  important themes throughout the book: social, political, and cultural issues; race, class, gender; development of  music business; and  development of technology. ­Each play an important role in  development of rock music as  musical style and force in popular culture.  ­music  business changed dramatically since early 1950s,  ­ realm of technology,  rise of radio in the 1920s, emergence of TV after World War II central  factors  in rock’s explosion into mainstream American culture in mid­1950s.  ­development of cable television facilitated  introduction of MTV in early 1980s.  ­race, class, and gender essential to understanding origins of rock,  ­constant challenge of stereotypes in this music,  ever present struggle for authenticity in form that  blends down­home vernacular sensibilities with public adoration and extreme wealth. Tracking the Popularity Arc. ­ studying rock’s history and progress from 1950s through the 1990s may notice  pattern of styles and their  popularity.  ­many cases, a specific style will appear within a relatively restricted geographic region and  remain  unknown to most fans of popular music.  ­ex, few rock fans were aware of  punk scene in New York during mid­1970s,  ­bands like: Television, the Ramones, and Blondie played to small, local audiences. ­American punk style, morph into new wave by  end of  decade, developed within small  subculture before  breaking into  national spotlight in 1978.  ­early 1980s, some artists formerly associated w/ punk embraced styles and commercial  strategies of  rock  mainstream; more die­hard, aggressive groups retreated back into the  underground.  ­rise of punk from  small, regional underground scene to mainstream pop culture, and subsequent retreat, follows  pattern we might think of as a “popularity arc.” ­stories of specific styles in rock music follow this template. ­Typically, histories of rock music account for  time each style spends in  pop limelight— peak of popularity arc—creating a chronology without examining a style’s pre­ mainstream roots or existence after commercial boom years. ­difficult to avoid such a historical account, similar problems arise in histories of other  musical styles (ex  jazz and classical music).  ­To keep  popularity arc in mind for any given style, ask following questions: ­How did the style arise? When did it peak in popularity? Does it still exist in a subculture  somewhere? How are elements of this style incorporated into current mainstream pop?
More Less

Related notes for MUSC 2150

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit