PSYC 2330 Lecture Notes - Lecture 18: Procedural Memory, Explicit Memory, Classical Conditioning

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29 Mar 2012
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Thursday, March 29, 2012
PSYC*2330 Lecture 18 Week 9
Procedural Memory System
-there is an affect involved in association
-classical conditioning involves emotion
-“response” = animal learns if they make the right turn they get the food - develop a
habit (stimulus-response)
-“place” - when the animals gets to the choice position, they look up and go towards
the direction it knows where the food is based on surroundings - they are making a
map of the maze - stimulus-stimulus
-to test this you can turn the maze around, the stimulus response rat will just turn right
and not find the food the stimulus-stimulus rat will find the food
-what the animal does depends on how much you train them
-the animals will essentially use both strategies at different stages of training
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-if you train them for a few days, and they are doing well and then you do the switch
- after a few training sessions they are using the place strategy
-if you train them over and over on the same task they will switch strategy so that most
animals will show a response strategy
Striatum
-Regulation of voluntary movements; planning, initiation & learning motor behaviour
-Affected in Parkinson’s disease - lack of dopamine to this area is the primary cause
motor deficits in Parkinson’s disease
-very important because it controls initiation and execution of movement
-if you have a lesion to this area you could have motor deficits
-also involved in acquisition and learning in motor behaviour
Evidence from Humans and Animals
-show them a series of cards and the symbols organize a different pattern
-a particular sequence of these cards will represent a particular prediction of weather
-you show them the cards one after the other and ask them what they think will happen
-normal people do get better, amnesic people do get better and parkinson’s disease
never improve they can never learn (line graph)
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-if you do a multiple choice questionnaire on the declarative component, normal people
and parkinson’s do very well and amnesiacs do not do well (bar graph)
-double association - lesion to hippocampus, you can do a habitual task but cannot
learn the declarative component to it
-lesion to striatum you cannot to a habitual task but can do the declarative component
Packard and McGaugh
-from place to habit response
-normal rats if you train them most of them will show a place response, if you over train
them they show a response strategy
-evidence that initially the rat is using the hippocampus, but if you overtrain them they
use the striatum
-using a different memory system through different stages of training
-if you make a lesion to hippocampus, they cannot do normal behaviour at first (place)
-if you make a lesion to striatum you will prevent them from developing habit (response)
-injections of lidocaine into the 1. Hippocampus 2. Striatum
-inject lidocaine into regions of the brain and can produce a temporary brain lesion you
can recover from
-white bar = normal, bar 2 = hippocampus, bar 3 = striatum
-inject into hippocampus at the initial stages of learning, they can’t learn (50%)
-inject into the striatum nothing happens
-2 weeks later inject in hippocampus and nothing happens, inject in striatum animals
are impaired and revert back to place strategy
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