Class Notes (836,562)
Canada (509,854)
KIN 261 (11)
All (5)
Lecture 3

Week 3 - The Canadian Health Care System

9 Pages
107 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Kinesiology
Course
KIN 261
Professor
All Professors
Semester
Spring

Description
Week 3 – The Canadian Health Care System 03/11/2014 Objective: identify and explain the key historical moments and policies underlying Canada’s current health  care system and key arguments in the public versus private health care debate  **Chapter 13 textbook Summary Canada’s current health care system is the product of over 100 years of history/ legislation There are many problems with the system but it is highly valued by Canadians Solutions to the existing problems are often discussed in relation to public versus private health care  Introduction British North America Act 1867: law that created the Canadian confederation Established that health care was the responsibility of the provincial government, not the federal. Each  province had its own system. Today, each province still has its own system, but there are universal  principles uniting all the systems.  There was not a universal health care system.  There are many consequences of not having universal system. For instance if an individual needed to go to the hospital, they had to pay themselves and they paid the  service providers directly. Individuals who could not afford the services were turned away because the  physician did not want to provide the services if they would not get paid. This was not only a problem for the  poor, but also for the middle class if they had a serious medical condition.  Consequences of Not Having Universal Health Insurance People paid out of their own pocket. The poor, elderly, and chronically ill often could not afford proper care.  Major illness could reduce even the most well off individuals.  Canada Medical Act (1912) Legislation passed by Sir Thomas Roddick (a surgeon turned politician) Standardization of licensing. Limited the number of doctors. This is important because limiting a resource increases its value. In order to  attract people to the profession, limiting the number increased their salaries.  Department of Health (1919) Under Prime Minister Borden, the first federal Department of Health was established in 1919.  Concerned with things like: quarantines, standards for food and drugs, coordination of public health and  campaign.  The Great Depression – 1930s Terrible poverty and suffering in Canada Lack of adequate nutrition and housing Increased rate of tuberculosis, pneumonia, influenza and other diseases  Patients unable to pay doctors’ bills ▯ government instituted medical relief to cover costs.  Pages 255­256 textbook** Health Policy during the Great Depression 1934 United Farmers of Alberta (UFA) government passed health insurance legislation 1935 Social Credit came to power in Alberta and the legislation was never implemented 1935 Patullo Liberal government in B.C. passed health insurance act. However due to opposition  (physicians, Conservative party) and lack of funding from the federal government, the act was never  implemented.  New Deal: at the federal level, Bennet introduced the ‘New Deal’ legislation in 1935 (included health  insurance) MacKenzie King came to power and declared the legislation unconstitutional (said it violated the provincial/  federal divide of responsibilities) Health Policy in the 1940’s  Draft legislation for universal health care introduced by the federal government (1945) to address  inadequate access to medical and hospital care, war time recruiting of soldiers (large numbers too sick for  military or industrial service) and poor status of Canadians generally.  The proposed legislation was to be cost­shared by federal and provincial governments Centered on belief that increased access to physicians and hospital care would lead to improved health of  Canadians.  The legislation was not implemented because provinces were concerned about federal incursion into their  jurisdiction and federal and provincial government could not come to an agreement (taxation issues).  Tommy Douglas – “Father of Universal Health Care” Born in Scotland in 1904, immigrated to Winnipeg Father was war veteran (worked in iron foundry)  Tommy and his two sisters had to drop in/out of school (they all worked to help pay the bills)  Underwent a life changing health experience. He had a bone infection at age 10 and underwent several unsuccessful knee operations. His family had no  money for specialist so they were told the only option was to amputate. A visiting surgeon did treatment for  free and saved his leg. This event inspired his dream for universal health care.  He was a Baptist minister turned politician. He joined the Cooperative Commonwealth Federation (CCF) party (Motto of ‘Humanity First’ + 70% of  budget to social services) Became premier of Saskatchewan for 17 years  In 1947 he increased number of health care facilities, created universal access to hospital care in  Saskatchewan and encouraged physicians and patients to think of hospitalization as first resort.  Medical Care Act (1966) Federal policy modeled on Saskatchewan’s system  It was strongly opposed by the Canadian Medical Association Entailed cost sharing (50:50) between the provinces and the federal government for medical services. Medical care act was criticized by physicians because they
More Less

Related notes for KIN 261

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit