Class Notes (835,062)
Canada (508,905)
Psychology (2,094)
PSYC 208 (100)
All (9)
Lecture

Autism and Other Pervasive Developmental Disorders Notes

5 Pages
68 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSYC 208
Professor
All Professors
Semester
Fall

Description
Autism and other pervasive developmental disorders Symptomatology and diagnostic criteria Characterized by a symptom triad 1. Communication deficits 2. Impaired social interaction 3. Restricted and stereotyped behaviours and interests Onset is in early infancy. Social and communicative impairments include • Lack of exploration of faces and appreciation of other communicative signals • Avoidance of eye contact • Inability to monitor other people’s gaze direction • Developmental delay of the ability to appreciate other people’s mental states  in term of beliefs, desires, knowledge, intentions, and dispositions. • Lack of empathy • Impaired ability to imitate observed behaviours The severity of autistic spectrum disorders can vary from mild forms such as  Asperger’s Syndrome or high­functioning autism or severe forms such as Kanner  autism which is associated with mental retardation (in approx two thirds of cases with  Kanner autism) or epilepsy (one­third). Some individuals with autism have extraordinary skills in divergent domains such as  calendar calculation, music, drawing, etc. These savants are usually intellectually  severely impaired. Epidemiology The prevelance of autism in the general population is 3 to 6 per 1,000. The male to  female ratio is about 3 to 4:1.  There has been a slight increase in the number of diagnosis as a result of the changes  in case definition and diagnostic sensitivity.  Genetic risk factors Autism is highly heritable such that the risk to develop the disorder is 30 to 120 times  higher for siblings of autistic children compared to the general population. Risk for MZ twins is between 40% and 90%, and between 0% and 10% for DZ twins. Theoretical models suggest that paternal or maternal imprinting could lead to an  overexpression of male characteristics in the brain and social cognitive impairments.  Environmental risk factors The relative risk for developing autism is increased in individuals with: • Tuberous sclerosis • Fragile X syndrome • Prenatal rubella • Prenatal exposure to toxins These factors account for less than 10% to 15% of cases. Higher parental age may also be associated to the onset of the disorder. Pathophysiological mechanisms The pathophysiology of autism is poorly understood. BDNF may be up­regulated in  the autistic brain, whereas apoptosis (programmed and selective cell death – this may  account fo the increased number of small densely packed neurons in some of the parts  of the autistic brain which are disconnected with the rest of the brain) is reduced.  Oxytocin (mediator of social cognition, bonding and sexuality) is down­regulated. Reduced serotonin levels in mothers of autistic children have been related to  alterations of brain development and maturation. Hypothesized that the mirror neuron system, which is considered critical for imitation  learning and probably contributes to the simulation of other people’s states of mind  may be functionally impaired in individuals with autism.  Evolutionary synthesis Ethological observation of autistic children suggests, at least in some milder forms of  the disorder, a motivational conflict between approaching a caregiver and avoidance,  perhaps due to enhanced timidity and fear. Avoidance of close contact is evident from very early on. Insecure attachment styles are found to be more prevalent in autistic children  compared to healthy controls. Parents of autistic children are on average no less sensitive than parents of normally  developing children.  Autistic school­age children, including those with high­functioning autism and  Asperger’s syndrome engage less in social play and experience more often social  isolation. As adults, they have profound difficulties in establishing close social relationships or  intimacy. Autistic individuals have problems understanding • Thoughts • Intentions • Feelings • Desires • Dispositions of others by making inferences about their mental states >  “Mentalizing” or “Theory of mind” Selective impairment of social information processing including mentalizing, emotion  recognition and face processing. Mentalizing deficits in autism, are, however, not directly linked to intelligence. Social cognitive functioning involved in mentalizing emerges in children in distinct  developmental steps but impaired mentalizing is not enough to explain social  aloofness in autism. Learning by imitaion is linked to the activity of specific meuronal cell populations  called mirror neurons. Mirror neurons are even active when the outcome of a movement is hidden from  observation. Imitating behaviour ad stimulating mental states have in common the ability to  imaginatively take the perspective of another individual. Imitation and o
More Less

Related notes for PSYC 208

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit