Class Notes (838,786)
Canada (511,086)
ERS120H5 (153)
Lecture 5

PSY270 – Lecture 5.docx

10 Pages
132 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Earth Science
Course
ERS120H5
Professor
Lindsay Schoenbohm
Semester
Fall

Description
PSY270 – Lecture 5 02/04/2014 • Test next week  • Long­Term Memory  • Key Themes  Structure vs. Function – we’re going to be talking more about function today  • • Bottom­up vs. Top­down processing – a lot of top­down effects   • Modular vs. domain general processing – largely we’re talking about the same processes that  work for all LTM  Declarative and non­declarative memory  Declarative (explicit) – things we say out loud and we remember  Non­declarative (implicit) – don’t remember these memories  Patients can suffer from amnesia  Amnesia  Retrograde amnesia: memory loss for events prior to trauma (brain trauma – some sort of injury) –don’t  remember what happened in the past  Extent of memory loss depends on the severity of the accident  Most memory loss for events that just happen just before  Remote memory (old memory) is what we remember more Retrograde amnesia improves over time – you get your memories that you lost previously before back  (oldest back first, then more come gradually)  Anterograde amnesia: memory loss for after the trauma (unable to form new memories) – this type of  amnesia does not improve over time Studying patients with this kind of amnesia which helps consolidation  H.M.  Seizures when he was 10 years old, but they never knew why he had them, and they got worse and worse  every time  His doctors decided to surgically remove a part of his brain – this seems quite severe, but it makes sense  when you think about what causes a seizures  (EEG) – different activity in the brain  seizures – different neurons in the brain are doing the same thing, and there is too much activity –  researchers don’t know what causes a seizure, but they start at one part of the brain  H.M. started with the medial temporal lobe – but it turns out his seizure removal was successful  He completely lost the ability to form new memories – loss of consolidation (long­term memory was a  problem)  He really had problems when his parents passed away, because he couldn’t form the new memories  He had the complete inability to form new memories  Why didn’t other parts of the brain take over the functions? Other parts of the brain aren’t able to consolidate memory like the “medial temporal lobe”  Is the hippocampus both necessary and sufficient for memory consolidation? – yes it is for long­term  memory (explicit memories)  What could H.M. Remember?  Able to form “priming task”  Word­completion tasks _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _  ­ the word is attention – H.M. showed normal functions on this test  He was able to tell what the “incomplete pictures” task  Same thing for procedural tasks: action, mirror tracing, and tower of Hanoi  Non­associative – learning that doesn’t involve stimulus  Episodic memory is what we think of when we think of LTM – who was there, what happened but semantic  memory, is what you know, its not the events you remember, it’s the things you know  Types of Different memory tasks: Explicit: recall tasks (remember the information – short answer), and recognition tasks (list of things that  you need to pick out one ­ MC)  Recall tasks:  Serial: remember the items in the order they were presented  Free­recall: remember the items in any order Cued­recall: given a hint, and recall using that hint (word that rhymed with toy) Implicit: procedural (mirror tracing, tower of Hanoi), and priming (picture completion tasks, and word  completion tasks)  Incidental task: surprise memory test (pop quiz – how much you remember) – just like the “surprise” we had  when we had to name the names of places of the recording  Tulving and Pearlstone – EXPERIMENT  Declarative Memory                     Memory Stores                         Control Processes  Why do we forget things?  Primacy effect: the things we remember at the beginning of the list and they are active in LTM Recency effect: things that take place recently and they are active in STM  Evidence that primacy and receney effects involve separate memory systems comes from observation that  we can eliminate one with the other  Poor memory for items in the middle can be explained by decay theory and interference theory  Why do we forget the items in the middle? Decay: over time information fades – hasn’t been transferred into LTM and fades from STM  Interference: other information gets in the way (2 types)  Retroactive inference (RI): inhibitory effects  of new information on old information (beginning of the list) Proactive inference (PI): inhibitory effects of old information on new information (end of the list)  items in the middle are affected by both proactive and retroactive interference  Release from Proactive Inference  Wicken’s (1976)  Presented people with three fruits (then he made them count backwards with three’s – prevent rehearsal) –  then made them report them  He did 3 trials, and each time, different fruits  Performance decreased with each trial – there was proactive interference  Then he had an important 4  trial – participants divided into two groups  Group 1: 3 vegetables  Group 2: fruit Group 3: meats  Group 4: professions  Over here, the items didn’t get in the way of the other stimuli) – these were unrelated, and the categories  and meanings were different – if something has a different meaning, its doesn’t have – as meaning became  more different, meaning become more and more important a proactive interference (we can store it  sem
More Less

Related notes for ERS120H5

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit