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PSY210H5 (300)
Lecture

PSY210H5 Lecture Notes - Feature Integration Theory, Neural Adaptation, Habituation


Department
Psychology
Course Code
PSY210H5
Professor
Elizabeth Johnson

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PSY270 - Jan 21
Attention/consciousness!
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Conscious VS unconscious processing !
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Bottom-up VS Top-down processing !
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Serial VS parallel processing !
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Attention for location VS object !
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Attention is the concentration of mental effort on sensory or mental events !
-overt attention (obviously looking at the thing)!
-covert attention (paying attention to something but not looking at it)!
-the difference between what an observer can tell what the person is looking at !
-endogenous attention (we decide what we are going to pay attention to, voluntarily) !
!- endogenous attention can be overt; can be covert!
-exogenous attention (when something external to us grabs our attention) !
!- exogenous attention can be overt; typically is not covert !
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Attention is intimately linked to consciousness (sensory level, physical level) !
-habituation: you no longer are aware of it as you get use to it and no longer pay attention to it !
-dishabituation: you brought attention back to the stimulus !
-sensory adaptation: not dishabituation; also when you stop become aware but at a different
location; our sensory neurons become not aware of it anymore; doesn't matter what you do,
you cannot regain that sense again !
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Inattentional blindness: (cognitive level)!
-if we dont pay attention to something we wont be consciously aware of it !
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Change blindness: !
-we are often “blind” to changes that occur within our visual fields !
-we can only pay attention to a limited amount of things !
-we pay attention to what is more important !
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Attention is driven by stimulus saliency (potent - strong): !
-motion !
-colour !
-brightness !
-contrast !
-orientation !
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Attention can be driven by other “important” information and previous knowledge (i.e. task at
hand) !
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Chabris, et al (2011) demonstrated that one “important” event can make us blind to an
unexpected “important” event !
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