Class Notes (920,388)
US (355,297)
Berkeley (8,461)
EPS (137)
EPS 7 (13)
Lecture 34

EPS 7 Lecture 34: 34. Domestic policy- CPP, ITC, PTC, alphabet soup

2 Pages
41 Views

Department
Earth And Planetary Science
Course Code
EPS 7
Professor
David Romps

This preview shows half of the first page. Sign up to view the full 2 pages of the document.
Lecture 34
Domestic policy: CPP, ITC, PTC, alphabet soup
Promoting switch to renewables
1) ITC
- The investment tax credit pays for 30% of the cost of installing solar PV on
your roof
- My house uses 350 W of electricity, 400 W isn’t enough (it is rated power)
- Rated power is the out put under idea conditions, e.g., facing 1000 W/m2 of
incoming sunlight
- The capacity factor is the ratio of actual power output to rated power output
- Actual power = capacity factor x rated power
- For solar in California, the capacity factor is roughly 0.15
- Since I need 350 W, the equation above becomes: 350 W = 0.15 x rated power
- Rated power = (350 W)/ 0.15 = 2300 W, the panel is about 250 W, so I need
(2300 W) / (250 W/ panel) = 9 panels
- What about nighttime?
2) PTC
- The production tax credit (PTC) provides 2 cents/kWh of electricity
generated by a wind turbine in the 10 years since its installation
- What the heck is kWh? It is a stupid unit, there are lots of stupid unit
- One smart unit: Joule
- 2 cents / kWh = 20 dollars / MWh = 20 dollars / (1 million W x 3600 s)
- = 20 dollars / (3.6 billion W x s) = 20 dollars / (3.6 billion J) = 20 dollars /
(3.6 GJ) = 20 dollars / (4GJ) = 5 dollars / GJ (is this a lot of a little?)
- The PTC pays 5$ /GJ for the first 10 years
- How many GJ do wind turbines generate in 10 years?
- Let us imagine that we install 1 W of wind turbines
- The cost of utility scale wind is 1$/ W, so that 1W of rated power costs us 1$
- For wind, the capacity factor = 0.3
- So, 1 W of rated power produces roughly 0.3 W of electricity
- How much energy does this 0.3 W amount to be in 10 years
- 0.3 watt x 10 years = 0.3 watt x 10 years x (30,000,000 s/ year)
- = 0.3 watt x 300,000,000 s = 90 MJ = 100 MJ = 0.1 GJ
- We pay 1$ to install 1 W of rated power wind turbine, and that generates 0.1
GJ of electricity each decade
- The PTC pays: 0.1 GJ x (5$/GJ) = 0.5 $
- The PTC effectively pays for roughly 50% of the installation
3) RPS
- Renewables portfolio standard: a requirement on retail electric suppliers
- To supply a minimum percentage or amount of their retail load with eligible
sources of renewable energy
4) Net metering
- Net metering is a policy, which caries from state to state, that allows
residential customers to pay only for the net amount of electricity they use
- I need 2.3 kW of rated power. How much would it cost to go solar, taking
advantage of the ITC and net metering?
- Cost of installing residential solar is roughly 3$/ W
- (2.3 kW) x ( 3$/ W) x (1-0.3) ITC
- = 6.9 k$ x 0.7
- = 7000$ x 0.7 = 5000 $

Loved by over 2.2 million students

Over 90% improved by at least one letter grade.

Leah — University of Toronto

OneClass has been such a huge help in my studies at UofT especially since I am a transfer student. OneClass is the study buddy I never had before and definitely gives me the extra push to get from a B to an A!

Leah — University of Toronto
Saarim — University of Michigan

Balancing social life With academics can be difficult, that is why I'm so glad that OneClass is out there where I can find the top notes for all of my classes. Now I can be the all-star student I want to be.

Saarim — University of Michigan
Jenna — University of Wisconsin

As a college student living on a college budget, I love how easy it is to earn gift cards just by submitting my notes.

Jenna — University of Wisconsin
Anne — University of California

OneClass has allowed me to catch up with my most difficult course! #lifesaver

Anne — University of California
Description
Lecture 34 Domestic policy: CPP, ITC, PTC, alphabet soup Promoting switch to renewables 1) ITC The investment tax credit pays for 30 of the cost of installing solar PV on your roof My house uses 350 W of electricity, 400 W isnt enough (it is rated power) Rated power is the out put under idea conditions, e.g., facing 1000 Wm2 of incoming sunlight The capacity factor is the ratio of actual power output to rated power output Actual power = capacity factor x rated power For solar in California, the capacity factor is roughly 0.15 Since I need 350 W, the equation above becomes: 350 W = 0.15 x rated power Rated power = (350 W) 0.15 = 2300 W, the panel is about 250 W, so I need (2300 W) (250 W panel) = 9 panels What about nighttime? 2) PTC The production tax credit (PTC) provides 2 centskWh of electricity generated by a wind turbine in the 10 years since its installation What the heck is kWh? It is a stupid unit, there are lots of stupid unit One smart unit: Joule 2 cents kWh = 20 dollars MWh = 20 dollars (1 million W x 3600 s) = 20 dollars (3.6 billion W x s) = 20 dollars (3.6 billion J) = 20 dollars (3.6 GJ) = 20 dollars (4GJ) = 5 dollars GJ (is this a lot of a little?) The PTC pays 5 GJ for the first 10 years How many GJ do wind turbines generate in 10 years? Let us imagine that we install 1 W of wind turbines The cost of utility scale wind is 1 W, so that 1W of rated power costs us 1 For wind, the capacity factor = 0.3 So, 1 W of rated power produces roughly 0.3 W of electricity How much energy does this 0.3 W amount to be in 10 years 0.3 watt x 10 years = 0.3 watt x 10 years x (30,000,000 s year) = 0.3 watt x 300,000,000 s = 90 MJ = 100 MJ = 0.1 GJ We pay 1 to install 1 W of rated power wind turbine, and that generates 0.1 GJ of electricity each decade The PTC pays: 0.1 GJ x (5GJ) = 0.5 The PTC effectively pays for roughly 50 of the installation 3) RPS Renewables portfolio standard: a requirement on retail electric suppliers To supply a minimum percentage or amount of their retail load with eligible sources of renewable energy 4) Net metering Net metering is a policy, which caries from state to state, that allows residential customers to pay only for the net amount of electricity they use I need 2.3 kW of rated power. How much would it cost to go solar, taking advantage of the ITC and net metering? Cost of installing residential solar is roughly 3 W (2.3 kW) x ( 3 W) x (10.3) ITC = 6.9 k x 0.7 = 7000 x 0.7 = 5000
More Less
Unlock Document

Only half of the first page are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

Unlock Document
You're Reading a Preview

Unlock to view full version

Unlock Document

Log In


OR

Don't have an account?

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit