Trade Blocs

8 Pages
153 Views
Unlock Document

Department
International Affairs
Course
INR 3933r
Professor
Dale Smith
Semester
Spring

Description
Trade Blocs: World Bank Report, 2000 02/19/2014 Competition and Scale Effects RIAs combine markets. Consequences? More competition; less monopoly power Three types of gains: Increased competition induces firms to cut prices and expand sales▯ benefits consumers Economies of scale can be more fully exploited As you expand production, the cost of every additional unit is lower than the previous one Reductions in internal inefficiencies  As competition increases within the RIA, non­member importers will also have to adjust. How?  Holds down the prices  RIAs also attract more FDI (Foreign Direct Investment) Why? After NAFTA, Mexico was flooded with FDI from non­NAFTA members because it gave them access to the  entire North American market Trade and Location Effects Trade Creation v. Trade Diversion (TC v. TD) Simple illustration on page 40 Examples of TD in the real world? Empirical examples are hard b/c it is really difficult to measure these things. They are mixed. RIAs lead to the relocation of economic activity  Industries expand in one country and contract in another What’s the effect? Convergence or divergence? Speed up the growth of GDP once a member joins an RIA Do worse relative to the group than you were doing before GDP wise Examples: EU w/ Ireland, Spain, & Portugal▯ Convergence Example: EU w/ Greece▯ Divergence (North vs. South would also be an ex) Internal v. External Comparative Advantage Example (pp. 53­54) General Argument : countries with CA closer to the world average do better in an RIA than countries  with more extreme CA Implication : RIAs between two poor countries will tend to cause divergence; but RIAs between two rich  countries will cause convergence Consequences for RIA between rich & poor?  Convergence, so the best thing for poor countries to do is integrate with the rich Agglomeration: tendency for certain types of economic activity to cluster in one location Centripetal forces : positive externalities Knowledge spillovers Labor­marketing pooling Linkages between buyers and sellers Centrifugal forces : negative externalities Congestion Pollution Competition for immobile factors Impact of an RIA: Probably not a problem for RIAs among high­income countries More likely to be a problem for RIAs among low­income countries Divergence & Agglomeration may be particularly problematic for RIAs among developing countries The Theory of Customs Unions Jacob Viner, The Customs Union Issue (1950) Essential features of a CU (FTA + CET): Elimination of tariffs on imports from member states Adoption of a common external tariff on imports from the rest of the world Trade Creation v. Trade Diversion Trade Creation: union­induced shift from consumption of higher cost domestic products to lower cost  products from another member­state (m­s). Production change : reduction/elimination of the domestic production of goods; goods now imported  from another m­s Consumption change : increased consumption of the good that is now imported due to lower cost Trade Diversion: union­induced shift in the source of imports from lower cost external sources to higher  cost partner sources Production change : shift from lower cost foreign sources to higher cost partner sources Consumption change : decreased consumption of the good that is now imported from a higher cost  partner source  **With multilateralism, there is no trade diversion, just trade creation **Regional
More Less

Related notes for INR 3933r

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit