OEB 52 2-13.docx

3 Pages
100 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Organismic and Evolutionary Biology
Course
Organismic and Evolutionary Biology OEB 52
Professor
Elena Kramer
Semester
Spring

Description
Lecture 6: Origin of the Land Plants Algae – not monophyletic, highly polyphyletic. They have arisen through many independent  endosymbiotic  events. Multicellularity has evolved 3 different times in alge – red, brown, and green  algae Green algae are also not monophyletic – they are paraphyletic. This is because land plants arose  from within the green algae. Land plants ARE monophyletic. So, term green algae is not a good  phylogenetic term.  So, land plants are defined by movement onto land.  Problems with no longer living in water? Dispersal issues – swimming sperm and spore dispersal Gravity – how do you support yourself? Pressure – depends on depth Dessication – physiological, support, photosynthesis, basic biological processes CO2 – issues about diffusion Choleachaete and Charales are closest sister groups to land plants. Neither gave rise ot land  plants, though What characteristics did land plants inherit from algal ancestors? Oogamy, matrophy, sporopollenin Cellulosic cell wall, chlorophyll a & b, phragmoplast, enzymes Multicellular haplontic lifecycle Ulvo has altenrationa of generations, some red algae do – these are completely independently  derived. All other algae leading up to land plants are strictly haplontic Specialized cells, terminal or marginal growth How did plants solve living on land? Where to live?  Stay in the boundary layer – they are very small. But this assumes that the surface is being  rewetted. As long as the substrate is wet, humidity will be high, but when it dries, it’s dry.  So, these early plants were small, thin and unprotected from water loss, they absorb water and  CO2 directly from the environment, no true roots, so must be desiccation tolerant.  This means they have an ability to survive cellular dehydration.  Normally, cells cannot go below 99% of relative humidity. But, with desiccation tolerance, they can  go lower. This desiccation tolerance is not really seen in complex plants, mostly just early, small  lineages Desiccation tolerance is largely the domain of the gametophyte, but also found in seeds. Seems to  be incompatible with vascular tissues.  In “resurrection” fern, one of few cases where desiccation can occur in diploid stage What structural adaptions needed to survive (thrive) outside of boundary layer? Mechanism to prevent water loss from surfaces: cuticle. Waxy layer Adaptions to control water loss include stomata (turgor controlled valves) and cuticle (water  impermeable layer made of waxes and fatty acids) Stomata – two adjacent guard cells – oriented bands of cellulose. When stomata are open, they  have the highest turgor pressure. When water becomes limiting, the water pressure decreases and  they relax, so they close.  Stomata: nexus of sensory input and response: light, CO2, water status Leaf is full of air spaces – so when stomata is open, CO2 can diffuse into air spaces But, there is a high concentration gradient for water, so open stomata, CO2 rushes in (low  concentration gradi
More Less

Related notes for Organismic and Evolutionary Biology OEB 52

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit