OEB 52 2-20.docx

2 Pages
83 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Organismic and Evolutionary Biology
Course
Organismic and Evolutionary Biology OEB 52
Professor
Elena Kramer
Semester
Spring

Description
Bryophytes Two transport systems in plants Xylem – transport water from soil to leaves. Under tension. Phloem – circulating sugars Both are bulk­flow phenomenon. Xylem is tension driven, as opposed to diffusion. Need to move  things faster than can diffuse over large plant volume Xylem volume flow is about 100x that of phloem because so much water leaving system through  leaves.  Zone of elongation – not so much cell division as elongation, turgor driven growth. In the zone of  elongation, vascular tissue is functional Primary wall construction : fiber reinforced gel Secondary wall formation: inside primary wall.  Rigid tubes? Why? Tubes need to resist the tension that is pulling the water up a chain of  molecules from soil to leaves. So, how does that force generate? In photosynthesis lecture, we thought about water status as relative humidity. But if want to really  understand transport in plant, need another way of thinking about availability of water Initially, pressure is same inside and outside, but concentrations are different. So evolves to  pressure isotonic, and concentrations same if have an elastic membrane. But if add a cell wall – cell wall resists being stretched by water trying to enter cell so only a little  water enters, this basically squeezes water, raising pressure of water, and system evolves to where  pressures and concentrations are not the same inside and outside. Instead, pressure difference  between in and out is proportional to concentration difference. This is described by RT (R= gas  constant, T= temperature). [but really temperature that is important].  This can be rearranged: water potential.  98% RH = ­2.8 MPa (mega paschal) 0.2 MPa turgor (positive pressure) – 3 MPa (osmotic potential  = RTC, concentration of sugars, salts, etc) Water flows to where it’s more negative Xylem water is super­heated fluid – should remain in a metastable liquid state if there is no pre­ existing vapor phase for it to boil into.  If living in a dry environment, need to be able to support high tensions in xylem.  Problems from metastability in water column? In bryophytes, pipes can collapse when system dehydrates. And when system rehydrates, they  regain their shape. Not particularly rigid. But not in trachiophytes. If tension becomes so great that  tubes implode, those tubes are destroyed in trachiophytes. This also provides support for plant axis  – Air­seeding – if an air bubble gets in, it will expand and form air embolism Freezing (see slide) So, a “designed leak” that preserve structural integrity of plant through air­seeding is better than the  tubes collapsing – you may lose water transfer capacity but  retain structural capacity. Not just bryophytes that do collapsing and reexpanding – a Podocarp also does this.  Cavitation: it’s a failure of air­water meniscus that causes the air bubble to get in. Smaller the radius  of curvature, larger the holes, but doesn’t take into account the gel phase of the membrane. We  don’t understand particularly well fracture in gels.  Protoxylem image
More Less

Related notes for Organismic and Evolutionary Biology OEB 52

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit