Class Notes (835,673)
United States (324,214)
Psychology (312)
PSY 101 (146)
Lecture 3

PSY101 Lecture 3.25.14 - Memory cont.

3 Pages
83 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSY 101
Professor
Professor Berg
Semester
Spring

Description
PSY 101 Lecture 3.25.14  Long Term Memory ­Permanent memory storage associated with preservation of info. For access at a later  time – record of all experiences (events, emotions, skills, etc)  ­Storage stretches from a few moments ago to early childhood  ­2 Basic Types of declarative Long Term Memory:  ­episodic memories: code the subjective experience of events and the context in  which they occur (ex. The tone your best friend uses when she is proud vs. upset)   ­semantic memories: code general info and categorical knowledge (meaning of  words and concepts) Retrieval Cues: internal or external stimuli that facilitate availability of associated  memories (ex. Seeing a photo of Niagara Falls reminds you of the last time you saw it in  person)  Recall: a method of memory retrieval in which an individual reproduces info that is  already stored in Long Term Memory  Recognition: a method of memory retrieval in which an individual identifies a stimulus  as one that has been experienced previously  Encoding Specificity: memories are most available when the context (internal or  external) at time of retrieval matches context at time of encoding  ­ex. Participants learned a set of words either on a beach or under water, then  given a test afterwards   ­performance up to 50% better when context matched between study and test –  this applies for: setting, internal state (mood, intoxication), and task demands  (learn in noise vs. quiet) Serial Position Effect: better memory for words at both the beginning and the end of a  list as compared to items in the middle ­primacy effect: refers to improved memory for items presented at the beginning  of the list  ­thought to be due to less competition for memory resources with fewer  exposures, and more time for rehearsal before recall task  ­recency effect: refers to improved memory for items presented at the end of the  list  ­thought to be due to items remaining available in short term memory, and  rehearsal processes can extend retention  Levels of Processing Theory: suggests that the deepness at which info is processed can  affect the probability of a memory being retained  ­increased depth of processing, increased likelihood of retention ­decreased depth of processing, decreased likelihood of retention  Forgetting: much of forgetting occurs shortly after the info was learned (this is why  cramming prior to an exam is not effective)  Interference: memories do not decay or burn out, they get interfered by new info that  has been added to storage  ­the mind is continually occup
More Less

Related notes for PSY 101

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit