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Lecture 18

Lecture 18 -- Politics, Power, & Violence.docx

by OneClass224907 , Fall 2012
1 Page
34 Views
Fall 2012

Department
Anthropology
Course Code
ANT 2000
Professor
Elyse Anderson
Lecture
18

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Politics, Power, & Violence
(Look at notes online)
Un-centralized forms = bands and tribes
Centralized forms = chiefdoms and states
Leaders weren’t born with a status; they achieved it (purely based on skill and intrinsic abilities)
Communities have quite a bit of power; because all of these societies are based on the ideas of
the group (group think)
Cacique = king
For state = don’t think of “better” with the use of “complex”; think of in scale (number of people,
number of buildings, etc.)
A nation and a state are not synonymous!
Most societies are not both a nation and a state
Adjudication = difference in authority
Anthropology’s uncomfortable relationship with ethnocide/genocide =
o Guilt from discipline’s history = theory that anthropologists have come up with
classifications and evidence that were used to support the need for genocide and
ethnocide; so anthropologists avoid the topic out of guilt
o Confront cultural relativism
o Open activism and/or participation = if you are going to participate in a study or
research, you need to avoid becoming an advocate; so the theory is that if you take a
stance on something, you are becoming an advocate
Has globalization led to extreme nationalism? =
o As more and more people come into contact with each other and experience other
cultures, the more and more people feel the need to declare their nationalism
o Thought is that anthropologists have contributed to that by making aware the differences
between groups of people
o Thought also is that even if anthropologists make those differences known, they cannot
control how people will use/react to the new information
Example of a revitalization movement = the hippy movement

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Description
Politics, Power, & Violence  (Look at notes online)  Un-centralized forms = bands and tribes  Centralized forms = chiefdoms and states  Leaders weren’t born with a status; they achieved it (purely based on skill and intrinsic abilities)  Communities have quite a bit of power; because all of these societies are based on the ideas of the group (group think)  Cacique = king  For state = don’t think of “better” with the use of “complex”; think of in scale (number of people, number of buildings, etc.)  A nation and a state are not synonymous!  Most societies are not both a nation and a state  Adjudication = difference in authority  Anthropology’s uncomfortable relationship with ethnocide/genocide = o Guilt from discipline’s history = theory that anthropologists have come up with classifications and evidence that were used to support the need for genocide and
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