COMM 123 Class 11.docx

8 Pages
49 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Communications
Course
COMM 123
Professor
Felicity Paxon
Semester
Fall

Description
COMM 123 Class 11 10/09/2013 Postmodernism: Modernity: Industrialization of production (technologies) Positivist faith in objective knowledge of phenomena Demographic upheaval/massive urban migration Growth of consumer capitalism Rise of multinational corporations “Instrumental” rationality and bureaucracy Powerful mass media systems Growth of nation—states Fluctuating world economy  Postmodernity: Disintegration of colonial system historically ruled by imperial nation—states  Decline of industrial capitalism and rise of transnational, information age economy Rise of global electronic and print media systems, collapsing traditional time and space Rise of new creative, artistic practices that reject modernism’s linearity, coherence, realism, and internal  consciousness Suspicion and rejection of “foundational” narratives of Western culture that traditionally have authorized the  dominant institutions Erosion of traditional identities  premised on stability and essence Studying postmodern theory is important because it is a new way of thinking about culture because it gave  people a new way to do things in literature, architecture, etc. It means something a little different in different  fields Key elements 1. Rejection of modernism’s canonization “It is in part a sensibility in revolt against the canonization of modernism’s avant­guard revolution…it  laments the passing of the scandalous and bohemian power of modernism, its ability to shock and disgust  the middle class…modernist culture has become bourgeois culture. Its subversive power has been drained  by the academy and the museum” –182 Like Gladwell’s analysis of how things are no longer cool once they are acknowledged as cool there is a  paradoxical notion where modernism was supposed to be different and challenge pre­existing structures.  Instead, modernism has become a part of high culture—movement from the periphery to the center Virginia Woolfe, TS Elliot, etc. are all part of this canon (canon is what we deemed to be the most important  literature for example) 2. Collapse of “high” vs. “low” binary (and for figures like Warhol, the collapse of  “ commercial” vs. “non commercial” binary) THIS IS BY FAR THE MOST IMPORTANT ASPECT OF POSTMODERNISM!!! Refusal to categorize No preordained distinction; people who try and make distinctions are those who wish to reproduce social  hierarchies  No such thing as good and bad taste, there is just art Pluralism of value Allows the voices of the margin to be heard because the established canon is up for debate  Refers to Pierre Bourdieu Warhol completely embraced commercial culture playing with low culture subject when he created his pop  art and then it was sold as high culture art at astronomical prices—barriers of high and low and commercial  and noncommercial are torn down Refers to album covers where pop art and pop music (i.e. The Beatles and The Rolling Stones albums)— textual poaching and recirculation of intertextual versions of the original Bansky, a European artist, sold high culture paintings are sold them for $60ish 3. End of metanarratives Metanarratives are narratives that try and explain where we are and where we are going (they are criticized  for shutting out other type of narratives); they are all encompassing theories Example: Christianity, liberalism, Marxism, Darwinism, Creationism, etc.  Under postmodernism these collapse because there is a crisis in knowledgeable truth Jean­Francois Lyotard:The Postmodern Condition —1979 Worried about the universalities as a means to an end—if there is no universal truth then what is the role of  a professor? Talks about the loss of power of the academy because people who were previously excluded from the  community find ways in (this inclusion viewpoint is the optimistic view of postmodernism) Okay with the collapse of metanarratives but he is not enthusiastic about the collapse of modernism  (sounds like MacDonald Literary digression: within literature there is also a death of the fixed narrative that has a traditional  beginning, middle, and end.  Kurt Vonnegut—Slaughterhouse Five Donald Barthelme—Snow White Ronald Sukenick—Long Talking Bad Condition Blues Almost as if we are looking at the death of the author and even further the death of the novel because  reality does not exist; lots of unreliable narrators under postmodernism  4. “Hyperrealism” characterized by simulacra, simulations… Jean Baudrillard, multiple works—derives this idea of hyperrealism Simulacra—a copy without an original i.e. a DVD, CD—who saw the original?  Baudrillard refers to Walter BimgingtonThe Work of Art in the Age of Mec
More Less

Related notes for COMM 123

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit