Study Guides (248,430)
Canada (121,530)
Sociology (282)
SOCI 1001 (83)

Global Inequality Review

2 Pages
96 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Sociology
Course
SOCI 1001
Professor
Tamy Superle
Semester
Fall

Description
Global Inequality 1.2 billion people do not have adequate access to water, 2.7 billion lack basic sanitation, and 24 000 children under 5 years  old a day die every day from preventable causes. • International Poverty Line: living on less than $1.25 (U.S.) a day, 1.22 billion people in the global south (21%). • Global stratification: the unequal distribution of wealth, power, and prestige on a global basis, the gap between the rich  and the poor is growing. • The gap is growing because of internal issues, such as war, gender inequality, corruption, class/caste inequality,  infrastructures and running them, and unable to support the population. • Developed nations: countries that are developed, industrialized, the global north, first world, rich countries, “the west.”  Example are Canada, the US, UK, Japan, Australia, France, and Germany. • Developing nations: countries that are developing into industrialized nations, second world, and middle incomes.  Examples are Mexico, China, Turkey, and Peru. • Underdevelopment: countries that are underdeveloped, non­industrial Global south, third world, and poor countries.  Examples are Bangladesh, countries in Sub­Saharan Africa (e.g. Rwanda, Democratic Republic of the Congo). • Absolute poverty: living on less than $1.25 (U.S.) a day. • Relative poverty: when people may be able to afford basic necessities but are unable to maintain an average standard. • Globalization: refers to a diverse series of trends and forces. It is a vast set of economic, political and social issues. The  tendency for businesses, technologies and political philosophies (e.g. democracy) to spread across the world. Fully or  partially ‘world­wide’ in scale and ramifications. It is the process of interaction and integration among people,  companies, and governments of different nations. International trade drives globalization. People are increasingly aware  of living in a ‘global world,’ there is a new growing awareness of global inequality and oppression. • Globalization is often used to mean economic processes. There is an increasing reliance of economies on each  other. The opportunities to be able to buy and sell in any country in the world. The opportunities for labour and  capital to locate anywhere in the world. The growth of global markets in finance. • The Global Economy: transnational corporations pursue cheap labour, low­cost infrastructure, and absence of labour  regulation. Labour in developing countries is legally unprotected and is non­unionized. Canada has transitions from  manufacturing economy to a post­industrial economy (service industry). • Positives: greater freedom of movement of goods, services, capital, and people. Increase in sharing of cultural  products, travel and migration, trade and commerce, access to more goods and services, and there are cheap goods  for the developed world. • Negatives: environmental degradation, homogenization of culture, and exploitation of workers. In Canada there is a  loss of domestic jobs (esp. manufacturing) and a weakening of the political power of workers and unions. • Over­consumption: one of the main contributions to global inequality (and environmental problems) is patterns of  consumption – particularly over – consumption • Colonialism: when a foreign power maintains political, social, economic and cultural domination over a people for an  extended period of time. The population is oppressed and the resources are exploited. • Neo­Colonialism: continuing dependence and foreign domination. • Debt: many countries have been forced to devalue their currency, cut welfare, and not put money into their economies.  They cannot invest in domestic education, agriculture, social programs, health care, and infrastructure. Developing  countries are in debt to the rich nations. • Rich countries/companies will loan money and demand that it’s repaid with interest. So instead of poor countries  being able to use their money to build their infrastructure they have to pay back debt. • Dependency: rich countries have a vested interest in maintaining a dependent status of poor countries, using the  population of poor countries to gather raw materials to be manufactured in the rich countries. • Theory: deliberate str
More Less

Related notes for SOCI 1001

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit