MCS 2020 Study Guide - Hacker Ethic, Categorical Imperative, Pseudonymity

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Published on 12 Apr 2013
School
University of Guelph
Department
Marketing and Consumer Studies
Course
MCS 2020
7-12 NOTES
Chapter 07 Info Ethics
Textbook Readings
o 7.1: Ethics for the Information Age
o 7.2: Consequence-based Reasoning
o 7.3: Action-oriented Reasoning
o 7.4: Ethics in Practice
o 7.5: The Future of Information Ethics
o 7.6: Codes of Conduct (experiment worksheet optional)
Learning Objectives
o Apply multiple ethical approaches to decision-making
o Understand and apply teleological and deontological reasoning
o Recognize the importance of codes of conduct for professionals and for
companies
o Understand and define conflict of interest
o Compare and contrast competitive intelligence with corporate espionage
o Acknowledge the difficulty associated with developing information
technology ethics for the Information Age
Key Terms
o The Golden Rule
o Egoism
o The Rule of Change
o Risk Aversion Principle
o No Free Lunch Rule
o Utilitarian Principle / Teleological
o Utility
o Pleasure vs. Pain
o Consequences
o Categorical Imperative / Deontological
o Conflict of Interest
o Duty
o Codes of Conduct
o Fiduciary Principle
o Property Principle
o Reliability Principle
o Transparency Principle
o Dignity Principle
o Fairness Principle
o Citizenship Principle
o Responsiveness Principle
o Competitive Intelligence
o Corporate Espionage
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Information Ethics in Practice
Why Ethics?
o Competing interests create ethical dilemmas
People (not organizations) make choice
People have the unique ability to reason ethically
o Unethical behaviour sends the wrong message
To employees
To the marketplace
To investors (socially responsible investing)
To public
Ethics: An Introduction
o Branch of Philosophy
Nature of moral virtue
Evaluates human actions
Individuals as free moral agents (free choice)
o Rational, secular study
Grounded in human happiness and well being
o Morals vs. Ethics
o Role of Law
Six Approaches
o The Golden Rule
o Egoism
o The Rule of Change (Descartes)
o Risk Aversion Principle
o No Free Lunch Rule
o Utilitarian Principle (Bentham, Stuart Mill)
o Categorical Imperative (Kant)
Teleological Ethics (Utilitarian Principle)
o Results-oriented ethics
Pragmatic, common-sense approach
o Actions have no moral value
Only the consequences of those actions do
o Actions that produce more benefit than harm are morally ‘right’
o Moral character depends on the practical nature of whether actions help
or hurt others
Jeremy Bentham (1748-1832)
o Wanted to develop a rational way of separating right from wrong
o Humans have two masters
Pleasure (makes life happier)
Pain (makes life worse)
o Theory of utility (Utilitarianism)
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The capacity to produce good or prevent evil
o Pleasure is the ultimate standard of morality
Employed ‘hedonistic calculus’
John Stuart Mill (1806-1873)
o Please and pain can be classified according to quality
High/low quality pleasure
High/low quality pain
o Personal experience helps distinguish the quality of pleasure and pain
o Any action is defensible (as long as it produces enough high quality
pleasure)
Deontological Ethics (Categorical Imperative)
o All actions have intrinsic moral value
o Some are inherently good
Honesty, respect, generosity
o Some are inherently bad
Theft, dishonesty, manipulation
o Consequence are irrelevant
The end never justifies the means
o These moral values are fundamental to human existence
Immanuel Kant (1742-1804)
o Categorical imperative
Fundamental moral law
Freedom and dignity (our inalienable rights)
Rooted in our human character
o Focused on the internal, rational aspect of human behaviour
o Ethics should be universally valid (like math)
If it is not right for everyone, it is not right for anyone
Ethical Analysis
o Identify and describe the facts
What things are known to be true?
o Define the conflict and higher-order values
What is the conflict really about?
o Identify the stakeholders
Who has an interest in the outcome
o Identify the (reasonable) options
What might be done?
o Identify the consequences of each option
What might happen?
Resolving an Ethical Dilemma
o Use teleological and deontological approached
Conflicting approached in theory
Complementary approached in practice
o Steps:
Analyze the Consequences
Analyze the Actions
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Document Summary

Textbook readings: 7. 1: ethics for the information age, 7. 2: consequence-based reasoning, 7. 3: action-oriented reasoning, 7. 4: ethics in practice, 7. 5: the future of information ethics, 7. 6: codes of conduct (experiment worksheet optional) Key terms: the golden rule, egoism, the rule of change, risk aversion principle, no free lunch rule, utilitarian principle / teleological, utility, pleasure vs. Pain: consequences, categorical imperative / deontological, conflict of interest, duty, codes of conduct, fiduciary principle, property principle, reliability principle, transparency principle, dignity principle, fairness principle, citizenship principle, responsiveness principle, competitive intelligence, corporate espionage. Information ethics in practice: competing interests create ethical dilemmas. People have the unique ability to reason ethically: unethical behaviour sends the wrong message. Ethics: an introduction: branch of philosophy. Individuals as free moral agents (free choice: rational, secular study. Grounded in human happiness and well being: morals vs. ethics, role of law.

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