NUTR 4210 Final: Sarcopenia

3 Pages
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Department
Nutrition
Course Code
NUTR 4210
Professor
Lindsay Robinson

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Sarcopenia
Loss of muscle mass & strength
Leads to neuromuscular impairment, loss of mobility, balance problems,
ireased falls & fratures, ioilizatio…
Viscous cycle!
Occurs naturally with aging
Disease is only evident once a threshold is reached
Nutrition & exercise can slow this!
Use imaging techniques to diagnose (could have normal BMI but low muscle
mass)
Sarcopenia: skeletal muscle mass 2 or more standard deviations below sex-specific
mean for young healthy adult
Not just loss of muscle mass, but loss of strength too
Muscle mass does not equal muscle function
Decline in strength exceeds what is expected based on decline in mass
Cat deterie futioal apaity ased o hat’s ee lost
Decline in muscle quality (force per unit of cross sectional area)
Decreased fiber size/number
Decreased contractile activity
Fat infiltration
Impaired neurological control on contraction
Decreased quality of muscle with aging
High quality: high oxidative capacity, high glucose transport capacity, high lipid
transport capacity
Sarcopenic obesity
Becoming more prevalent: population is aging and there is an obesity epidemic!
Agai, a’t tell y lookig at a oese perso if they hae SO
Normal age related body changes
Fat mass increases from birth, peaks around 60-75
Differences in where adipose tissue is stored
Visceral fat and intramuscular fat increase throughout lifetime, subcutaneous
does not
Fat in muscle lower muscle strength
Fat & muscle mass
More fat you have, more muscle mass you need (larger mechanical load)
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Description
Sarcopenia  Loss of muscle mass & strength  Leads to neuromuscular impairment, loss of mobility, balance problems, increased falls & fractures, immobilization…  Viscous cycle!  Occurs naturally with aging  Disease is only evident once a threshold is reached  Nutrition & exercise can slow this!  Use imaging techniques to diagnose (could have normal BMI but low muscle mass) Sarcopenia: skeletal muscle mass 2 or more standard deviations below sex-specific mean for young healthy adult Not just loss of muscle mass, but loss of strength too  Muscle mass does not equal muscle function  Decline in strength exceeds what is expected based on decline in mass  Cant determine functional capacity based on what’s been lost  Decline in muscle quality (force per unit of cross sectional area)  Decreased fiber size/number  Decreased contractile activity  Fat infiltration  Impaired neurological control on contraction Decreased quality of muscle with aging  High quality: high oxidative capacity, high glucose transport capacity, high lipid transport capacity Sarcopenic obesity  Becoming more prevalent: population is aging and there is an obesity epidemic!  Again, can’t tell by looking at an obese person if they have SO Normal age related body changes  Fat mass increases from birth, peaks around 60-75  Differences in where adipose tissue is stored  Visceral fat and intramuscular fat increase throughout lifetime, subcutaneous does not  Fat in muscle  lower muscle strength Fat & muscle mass  More fat you have, more muscle mass you need (larger mechanical load)  1kg adipose needs 0.1kg skeletal
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