Study Guides (248,144)
Canada (121,340)
Commerce  (94)
COMM 231 (35)
Final

Comm 231 - Final Exam.docx

10 Pages
891 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Commerce 
Course
COMM 231
Professor
Joseph Radocchia
Semester
Winter

Description
1 COMM – Final Exam Chapter 7: Formation of a Contract: Capacity to Contract & Legality of Object Requirements of a Valid Contract 1. Offer & Acceptance = Consensus 2. Consideration 3. Intention 4. Capacity 5. Legality 6.Writing if required by statute Capacity to Contract Those w/o capacity to contract:  1. Minors    2. Adults of diminished capacity    3. Enemy aliens 4. Aboriginals living on reservations   5. Bankrupt debtors Capacity – Minors Contracts are voidable at the option of the minor EXCEPT: Necessaries (Quantum meruit)   : Beneficial contracts of service ­May become liable for other contracts upon reaching age of majority Capacity – Adults of Diminished Capacity Must prove: ­Incapacity ­Other party knew or ought to have know of incapacity ­Must repudiate the contract promptly Capacity – 3 1. Corporations    ­Public bodies’ capacity may be limited by legislation 2. Labour Unions    ­Status varies by province 3. Enemy Aliens   ­Contracts are void or suspended Capacity – 4 Aboriginal Peoples  ­Status Indians have restricted capacity to contract while living on a reserve Bankrupt Debtors  ­Undischarged bankrupts must notify potential contracting parties Void, Voidable and Illegal Contracts ­Voidable contract may be set aside ­Void contract never existed    ­Court may attempt to restore the parties to their original positions ­An illegal contract is void and the court will not aid either party Categories of Illegal Contracts ILLEGAL BY REASON OF: 1.Statue 2.Public Policy 3. Common Law Illegal by Statue 2 i.e.  Contracts in violation of Criminal Code or Competition Act ­Agreements contrary to purpose of legislation      ­Cannot contract out of Workers’ Compensation Legislation Illegal by Common Law or Public Policy ­Contracts contemplating commission of a tort ­Any contract prejudicial to public interest i.e. promises not to report crime to the police if restitution made Agreements in Restraint of Trade ­Public policy prohibits restraint of competition ­Restrictive covenants are presumed to violate public policy unless: ­Reasonable b/w the parties ­Do not adversely affect public interest Restrictive Covenants B/W Employee and Employer ­Contracts restricting competition w employer while in service of employer are valid ­Restraints on employee w access to trade secrets/confidential info  ­Restraints effectively prevent an employee from accepting another job usually void ­Consider non­solicitation clause Chapter 8: Grounds Upon which a Contract May be Impeached: MISTAKE Meaning of Mistake ­Mistake in law, not an error in judgment, but an error with respect to either:     1. Terms of the contract; or     2. Assumption regarding the facts leading to the formation of the contract ­Parties (one or both) may have misunderstanding of contracting (NO meeting of minds) Mistake About Terms – 1. Terms ­One party may inadvertently use the wrong words in stating the terms ­Relief is granted if the reasonable person have recognized that mistake was made   i. About existence what dealing with        Couturier v. Hastings (pg 186) ii. Mistake about value of subject matter (Intent)     Hystry v. Smith (pg 187) Mistake about Terms – 2. Subject Matter ­Mistake about subject matter, recording the agreement Relief if:  ­Parties were in complete agreement ­No further negotiations to amend contract ­Change in written document; most easily explained as recording mistake ­Rectification = correct mistake (very rare); defendant must know it’s a mistake Mistake about Terms – 3. Non Est Factum ­Misunderstandings about meaning of words; non est factum = not my doing ­Parties have different interpretations of an ambiguous term ­Court will apply most reasonable interpretation in light of circumstances ­RARE; however, first nations use it (treaty violations) Mistake About Assumptions – 1 ­Party may make mistake about existence of subject matter of contract ­Subject of contract was destroyed prior to contract formation, contract = VOID 3 Mistake about Assumptions – 2 ­Party may make a mistake about the value of the contract ­Mutual intention of parties? ­Relief may be granted if it would be unconscionable not to do so Mistake about Assumptions – 3 ­Mistake about assumed future events ­Unforeseen events may make performance impossible ­These contracts are frustrated rd  Mistake and Innocent 3     Parties  ­Goods obtained under a void contract my be reclaimed by the seller ­Innocent purchaser does not hold good title Voidable Contract ­Contract is voidable – court decides if equitable to set aside contract ­An innocent third party purchaser for value will obtain good title Mistake about Nature of a Signed Document Contract voidable if: ­Signor could not read it ­Was not careless ­Subject matter is completely different than signor belieed ­DEFENCE: non est factum Mistakes in Performance Arise upon overpayment Remedy: where there has been unjust enrichment the recipient must repay the money (restitution) Chapter 9: Ground Upon Which a Contract May Be Impeached Misrepresentation ­False statement of fact which induces other party to enter into a contract ­Silence is not misrepresentation ­Statement of opinion is not misrepresentation ­Misrepresentation must be material Types of Misrepresentation 1. Innocent   ­Inaccurate statement, BUT believes its true   ­Recession is aggrieved party’s remedy (restricted to recession) 2.Negligent   ­Innocent misrepresentation becomes fraudulent if not corrected when discovered   ­Carless behaviour (Remedy: recession & damages) 3. Negligent   ­Person making statement was careless in not ascertaining the truth   ­Inaccurate/purposeful statement   ­Tough to prove, beyond balance of probabilities; lines of criminal law   ­Sue in both fraudulent & innocent misrepresentation ­Misrepresentations occur when you fail to omit details Signed Documents & Misrepresentation by Omission ­Presumption that signing document indicates acceptance of terms ­Presumption is rebuttable where unusual/unexpected terms not drawn to signors attention 4 Remedies for Misrepresentation ­Victim must renounce contract promptly ­Rescission undoes the contract, put back into original positions Rescission unavailable: ­Contract is affirmed (accepted/confirmed) ­Bona fide third parties would be prejudiced ­Negligent and fraudulent misrepresentations are torts ­Rescission and/or damages Contracts Requiring Disclosure Contracts of utmost good faith require disclosure of all pertinent info i.e.: ­Partnership agreemtns ­Insurance contracts ­Sale of Corporate Securities to public ­Caveat Emptor applies to quality or condition of goods, not to title/right to sell Undue Influence. Unconscionability, and Duress ­Undermines presumed freedom of contract ­Contract will be voidable if victim acts promptly ­Quantum Meriut = fair market price 4 service Undue Influence Presumed in: ­Family relationships w inequality ­Relationships where one party possesses special skill or knowledge ­Relationship where one person is in dire straits (desperate situation) ­Presumption may be rebutted ­Independent legal advice will rebut the presumption Unconscionability and Duress Unconscionability ­Extreme inequality of bargaining power renders a contract voidable ­If let contract stand it will shock the conscious Duress ­Threat of violence renders a contract voidable ­i.e. creation of contract happened b/c of violence Chapter 10: Requirement of Writing Form of a Contract Contract may be: ­Written ­Oral ­Combination of both forms Statue of Frauds ­Statute of Frauds 1677, requires certain contracts to be written form ­Where these types of contracts not in written form = unenforceable ­Application of law made some contracts bad ­B.C. rid of Statute of Frauds ­Contracts of Guarantee: Must be written & under seal (consideration & value) ­Contracts of indemnity (paid back) B▯S▯M  = S▯ ­On same primary level as others; 5 ­Oral or verbal Contracts Affected by the Statue of Frauds Written evidence required for:  ­Contracts concerning land or interest in land ­Guarantees (and in some provinces, indemnities) ­Agreements not to be performed within one year ­Contracts that require ratification by infants when they come of age ­An indefiniate period can be oral ­B/c memories fade Requirements for Written Contract Essential terms ­Names of parties ­Subject matter ­Consideration ­Terms may be found in several documents taken together ­Must be signed by the defendant Effect of the Statue Unenforceable but: ­Someone who has accepted a benefit must pay for it ­Written document created after the contact was formed is effective if created before the lawsuit ­Defendant must argue Statue for it to be effective ­Verbal contract may change or end prior to written contract Part Performance ­Absence of a written contract, a contract about land will be enforced if: ­Actions suggest existence of a contract ­Plaintiff performed those actions and will suffer loss if contract not enforced Sales of Goods Act In provinces other than Ontario & B.C.; ­Must be in writing; ­Show acceptance and receipt of goods by buyer ­Part payment accepted by seller Consumer Protection Legislation ­Written contracts are required for the purchase of goods to be performed at later time ­ To ensure that the buyer has had full disclosure Common Statutory Written Requirements ­Detailed description of goods or services ­Itemized purchase price ­Detailed disclosure of cost of borrowing ­Name, address, and contract information of the vendor ­Notice of statutory cancellation rights ­Complete copy provided to the customer Statutory Writing Requirements Types include: ­Future performance contracts ­Direct sales contracts ­Distance or remote contracts ­Internet contracts Designated 
More Less

Related notes for COMM 231

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit